Wildlife in Central Mountains Region

 Sage Grouse Habitat Management

   
Show Articles on Sage Grouse Habitat Management (57)
Up In Smoke: Fire and Invasives on Western Rangelands
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Sagebrush rangelands once covered nearly 250 million acres in western North America. Today, this landscape has been reduced to half its original size and is rapidly shrinking.

 

Using Existing Tools to Expand Cooperative Conservation for Candidate Species Across Federal and Non-Federal Lands
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For many years the Service has worked with partners to help them develop Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCAs). CCAs primarily have been developed by Federal agencies to cover Federal lands, and several have resulted in conservation efforts that made listing unnecessary.

 

Reducing Conflict with Grizzly Bears, Wolves and Elk A Western Landowners’ Guide
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This guide has been produced by and for landowners and practitioners constructively engaged in one of the greatest conservation challenges of our time—how to share and manage a wild, working landscape that sustains both people and wildlife.

 

Cooperative Conservation - Determinants of Landowner Engagement in Conserving Endangered Species
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This paper analyzes surveys of private landowners to identify factors that determine landowner engagement in the conservation of endangered species.

 

Western Governors’ Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative
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The Western Governors’ Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative was launched by WGA Chairman and Wyoming Gov.

 

Greater Sage Grouse - Colorado Synthesis Report
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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is poised to propose a listing decision for the Greater Sage Grouse under the Endangered Species Act by 2015.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Appendices
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Appendices for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Conservation Strategy
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Conservation strategy for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Analysis
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Analysis for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Issues
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Issues section of the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Conservation Assessment
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Conservation assessment for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Executive Summary
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Executive summary for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Table of Contents
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Table of Contents for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Introduction
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The purpose of the Colorado Greater Sage-grouse Conservation Plan (CCP) is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Greater Sage-Grouse Range-Wide Mitigation Framework
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The purpose of this document is to help states, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and other partners develop and implement coordinated and robust mitigation processes across the range to reduce threats and the potential need to list the species under the Endangered Species Act.

 

Gunnison Sage Grouse Rangewide Conservation Plan
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This Rangewide Conservation Plan is intended to supplement local plans, and to offer a rangewide perspective, so as to ensure that the cumulative result of conserving local populations is conservation of the species.

 

Safe Harbor - Helping Landowners Help Endangered Species
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This handbook describes safe harbor agreements and the way in which they work. It aims to help you decide if a safe harbor agreement makes sense for your land.& ...

 

Adverse Impact Reduction Handbook
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Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach

 

Weed Management for Small Rural Acreages
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A CSU Extension Fact Sheet with information on prevention, eradication, and control of common weeds found in Colorado.

 

Sage Grouse Initiative Web Map Application

The SGI Interactive Web Map Application is free and available to the public, presenting cutting-edge geospatial data covering 100 million acres. The Sage Grouse Initiative science team has developed an easy-to-use web application that helps visualize, distribute, and interact with information about the sagebrush-steppe ecosystem.

All of the information can be easily visualized on top of physical maps or the latest satellite imagery. Users can quickly identify and compare areas of concern, evaluating potential restoration or prevention opportunities. Data can be imported from the web application directly into GIS software, which allows the public to customize the information for land management or conservation purposes. Data for individual counties can be downloaded using these simple instructions.

 

Northwest Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Approved Resource Management Plan Amendment
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This Approved Resource Management Plan Amendment (ARMPA) is the result of the March 2010 US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) 12-Month Finding for Petitions to List the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as Threatened or Endangered (75 Federal  Register 13910, March 23, 2010;USFWS 2010).

 

Pocket Guide to Sagebrush Birds
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This Guide was created by staffs at Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory and at PRBO Conservation Science, describes 40 of the most common bird species in sagebrush habitats.& ...

 

Pocket Guide to Sagebrush
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This Guide provides identifying characteristics and range maps for 18 species of sagebrush, encompassing 27 different kinds (including subspecies and hybrids).

 

Greater Sage-grouse Comprehensive Conservation Strategy
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This Strategy outlines the critical need to develop the associations among local, state, provincial, tribal, and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individual citizens to design and implement cooperative actions to support robust populations of sage-grouse and the landscapes and habitats upon which they depend.

 

Summary of Science, Activities, Programs, and Policies That Influence the Rangewide Conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)
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Sage Grouse Initiative - Success on the Range
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The Sage Grouse Initiative launched in 2010 and five years later is a primary catalyst for sage-steppe conservation, conserving 4.4 million acres across 11 western states.

 

Science to Solutions - Private Lands Vital to Conserving Wet Areas for Sage Grouse Summer Habitat
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A recent groundbreaking study reveals a strong link between sites, which are essential summer habitat for sage grouse to raise their broods, and the distribution of sage grouse breeding areas or leks.

 

BLM Fire and Aviation - Sage Grouse Efforts
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Fire is an important part of the ecology of sagebrush habitats. It’s not possible to eliminate all fire from sagebrush, nor is it advisable.

 

Trial by Fire - Improving Our Ability to Reduce Wildfire Impacts to Sage-Grouse and Sagebrush Ecosystems Through Accelerated Partner Collaboration
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Wildfire and subsequent invasion by exotic annual grasses in the Great Basin challenge land managers and impede the success of conservation practices designed to improve habitat quality for sage-grouse.

 

Birds in a sagebrush sea - managing sagebrush habitats for bird communities
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The purpose of this document is to help anyone who is a steward of sagebrush shrublands include management practices that help support a thriving community of wild birds.

 

Science to Solutions - Conifer Removal Restores Sage Grouse Habitat
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The invasion of juniper and other conifers into sagebrush rangelands degrades habitat for sage grouse. The most effective approach is to target early encroachment stands, completely removing small trees, and thereby sustaining the existing sagebrush community.

 

Livestock Water Tanks and Sage-grouse - A Landowners Guide
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Watering tanks installed for livestock are often used by wildlife as well, with unintended consequences. Sage-grouse are known to drown in livestock water tanks that do not have escape ramps.

 

Science to Solutions - Marking High-Risk Fences Saves Sage Grouse
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Marking fences for visibility can dramatically reduce sage grouse collisions. A new mapping tool can help managers and landowners target those fences that pose the highest risk for grouse strikes: fences close to leks and in flat or rolling terrain.

 

Who’s on the Lek A Guide to Players
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Document describes some of the key entities in the conservation of sage-grouse and sagebrush ecosystems.

 

Interagency Sage-grouse Conservation Implementation MOU
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MOU provides for cooperation among the participating State and federal land, wildlife management and science agencies in the conservation and management of Greater sage-grouse, sagebrush habitats and other sagebrush-dependent wildlife throughout the Western United States and Canada.

 

Overview of Greater Sage-grouse and Endangered Species Act Activities
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The Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a game bird managed under State authorities. Summarizes petitions to USFWS to list the species under ESA, the Services conclusions and litigation status.

 

Sage-grouse Mapping and Priority Habitats
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This primer displays the historic and current range of sage-grouse, sage-grouse management zones, and the breeding bird density map.

 

Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Findings for Petitions to List the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as Threatened or Endangered
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Fish and Wildlife Service’s March 2010 status review provides a detailed description of seasonal habitats, sage-grouse natural history and population trend analyses.

 

Beginner’s Guide to Greater Sage-Grouse
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Introductory guide provides key points for a basic understanding of the greater sage-grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus and  its habitats.

 

Near Term Sage-Grouse Conservation Action Plan
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Plan presented to Greater Sage-grouse Executive Oversight Committee & Sage-Grouse Task Force, September 11, 2012.

 

Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) Conservation Objectives - Final Report
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February 2013 report delineates reasonable objectives, based upon the best scientific and commercial data available at the time of its release, for the conservation and survival of greater sage-grouse.

 

Conserving Wildlife and Crucial Habitat in the West
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Policy Resolution 13-04: Western Governors direct the Western Governors’ Wildlife Council to continue its guidance in the development, management and implementation with partners of the state and West-wide CHATs.

 

Sage-Grouse Initiative - Conservation Beyond Boundaries
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2012 Progress Report describes the need, goals, and results/outcomes of the Initiative.

 

Two Win-Win Initiatives with Common Recovery Goals Lesser Prairie-Chicken and Greater Sage-Grouse
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Lesser prairie-chickens and greater sage-grouse depend on large prairie and steppe landscapes shared by agricultural producers, primarily ranching operations.

 

Sage Grouse Initiative - Tracking Success
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The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) launched the Sage Grouse Initiative in 2010, applying the power of the Farm Bill to target lands where habitats are intact and sage grouse numbers are highest.

 

Applying the Sage-Grouse Fence Collision Risk Tool to Reduce Bird Strikes
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A Landowner's Guide to Wildlife Friendly Fences - How to Build Fence with Wildlife in Mind
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A Landowner's Guide to Fences and Wildlife - Practical Tips to Make Your Fences Wildlife Friendly
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Wyoming Edition  

 

Influences of Livestock Grazing on Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat - Context and Management
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Greater Sage-Grouse Field Indicator Guide
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This brochure is offered to the public to further outreach and education about sage-grouse; a species being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Program.

 

Native Plants - A Quick Reference Guide
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Learn more about native plants, get involved, and spread the word!

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Predictability FAQs
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Working Lands for Wildlife Implementation Process
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Working Lands for Wildlife Greater Sage-Grouse
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FAQs Including CCAA and SGI Comparison

 

Inventory of State and Local Governments’ Conservation Initiatives for Sage-Grouse
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The 2014 Sage-Grouse Appendix identifies all sage-grouse conservation initiatives reported by states and counties between 2011 and 2014. &n ...

 

Sage-Grouse Inventory - 2014 Conservation Initiatives
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The fourth annual inventory produced by the Governors, through the Western Governors' Association, has expanded its focus from previous years.

 

Conservation Assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and Sagebrush Habitats
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In this report, the authors assessed the ecological status and potential factors that influenced greater sage-grouse and sagebrush habitats across their entire distribution.& ...

 

Show Sage Grouse Habitat Management Organizations & Professionals (500)
There are 500 resources serving Central Mountains Region in the following categories:
map itMap of Sage Grouse Habitat Management Organizations & Professionals serving Central Mountains Region
Biologists / Ecologists
Alan Carpenter, PhD
Land Stewardship Consulting, Inc. - Boulder, CO
Basin Wildlife Consulting
Rick Danvir - Casper, WY
Bob Hix
Pheasants Forever Inc. - Regional Field Representative - Aurora, CO
Chris Pague
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Senior Conservation Ecologist - Denver, CO
Colorado Wildlife Science, LLC
Jonathan Lowsky - Principal Ecologist - Basalt, CO
David McGillivary
Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program - Chief - Lakewood, CO
Dawn Reeder
Rare Earth Sciences, LLC - Principal Biologist - Paonia, CO
Eco-Asset Solutions & Innovations LLC
William Coleman - Co-Founder & CEO - Redwood City, CA
Gillian Bee
Bird Conservancy of the Rockies - Stewardship Director - Fort Collins, CO
Greg Simons
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Wildlife Biologist - San Angelo, TX
Kit H. Buell
Buell Environmental LLC - Ecologist - Oak Creek, CO
Kristina Kline
Private Lands Wildlife Biologist - Durango, CO
Lisa Tasker
EM Ecological, LLC - Principal Ecologist - Aspen, CO
Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc.
James Schriever - Vice President Geospatial Services - Woodland Park, CO
Matt Tobler
Blue Mountain Environmental Consulting, LLC - Natural Resource Specialist/Director - Fort Collins, CO
Patty Knupp
Area Biologist - USDA-NRCS Area Three Office - Pueblo, CO
Riverbend Engineering, LLC.
Chris Philips, MS, PE, CFM - Owner and Senior Scientist - Albuquerque, NM
Roe Ecological Services, LLC
Chris and Kelly Roe - Logan, KS
Roger Wolfe
Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies - Lesser Prairie Chicken Program Manager - Topeka, KS
Ruben Cantu
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Certified Wildlife Biologist, Certified Professional Rangeland Management - San Angelo, TX
Seth Gallagher
Sage Grouse Initiative - Field Capacity and Delivery Coordinator - Fort Collins, CO
Stephen R. Wenger
- Glade Park, CO
Steve Boyle
BIO-Logic, Inc. - Principal & Senior Biologist - Montrose, CO
Tammy VerCauteren
Executive Director, Administration - Prairie Partners Program - Fort Collins, CO
Terri Schulz
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director of Landscape Science and Management - Denver, CO
Tim Malloy
TG Malloy Consulting, LLC - Land Planner - Glenwood Springs, CO
Ty Woodward
Private Lands Wildlife Biologist - Woodland Park, CO
West Elks Ecological Consulting
Dawn Barton - Owner, Founder of West Elks, and Principal Biologist - Carbondale, CO
Conservation Districts
Bookcliff Conservation District
Sharie Prow - District Manager - Glenwood Springs, CO
Colorado Association of Conservation Districts
Sharon Pattee - Executive Director, Secretary/Treasurer - Fountain, CO
Eagle County Conservation District
Courtney Grant - District Manager - Eagle, CO
Fremont Conservation District
Debbie Mitchell - District Manager - Canon City, CO
Gunnison Conservation District
Kim Antonucci - District Manager - Gunnison, CO
Jefferson Conservation District
- Denver, CO
Lake County Conservation District
Joan Dawson - District Manager - Leadville, CO
Middle Park Conservation District
Katlin Miller - Executive Director - Kremmling, CO
Mount Sopris Conservation District
Sharie Prow - District Manager - Glenwood Springs, CO
Shavano Conservation District
Bert Earle - District Manager - Montrose, CO
South Side Conservation District
Sharie Prow - District Manager - Glenwood Springs, CO
Teller-Park Conservation District
Marisa Neuzil - District Manager - Woodland Park, CO
Upper Arkansas Conservation District
- Salida, CO
Conservation Groups and Associations
Access Fund
Jim Chase - Operations Director - Boulder, CO
Agrarian Trust
Ian McSweeney - Director - Weare, NH
AGree
- Transforming Food & Ag Policy - Washington, DC
American Agri-Women
- Colchester, VT
American Farm Bureau Federation
- Washington, DC
American Forest Foundation
- Washington, DC
American Forests
Eric Sprague - Director of Forest Conservation - Washington, DC
American Friends of Canadian Land Trusts
Sandra Tassel - Program Coordinator - Bellingham, WA
American Hiking Society
- Silver Spring, MD
American Tree Farm System
Paul DeLong - Senior Vice President, ATFS & Conservation - Washington, DC
Arbor Day Foundation
- Nebraska City, NE
Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies
- Washington, DC
Bat Conservation International
- Austin, TX
Biobased Maine
- Portland, ME
Bird Conservancy of the Rockies
- Brighton, CO
Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
Roberta Clowater - Executive Director - Fredericton, NB
Center for Collaborative Conservation
Warner College of Natural Resources - Colorado State University - Fort Collins, CO
Center for Large Landscape Conservation
- Bozeman, MT
Chris Pague
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Senior Conservation Ecologist - Denver, CO
Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance
- Missoula, MT
CitSci.org
Greg Newman - Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory at Colorado State University - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation
Brooke S. Fox - President/CEO - Castle Rock, CO
Colorado Cattlemen’s Association
Sarah Smith - Marketing & Communications Director - Arvada, CO
Colorado Mountain Club
Scott Robson - Executive Director - Golden, CO
Colorado Nonprofit Association
Renny Fagan - President and CEO - Denver, CO
Colorado Pheasants Forever
Bob Hix - Regional Representative for Colorado & Wyoming - Aurora, CO
Colorado State Land Board
- Denver, CO
Colorado Watershed Assembly
Casey Davenhill - Executive Director - Denver, CO
Community for Sustainable Energy
Fred Kirsch - Director - Fort Collins, CO
Conservation Colorado
Beka WilsonCO
Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC)
- West Lafayette, IN
Continental Dialogue on Non-Native Forests Insects and Diseases
- Sheffield, MA
EcoResults!
- Flagstaff, AZ
Environment Colorado
Kim Stevens - State Director - Denver, CO
Equine Land Conservation Resource
Denise O’Meara, PLA - Director of Education - Lexington, KY
Family Farm Alliance
Dan Keppen - Executive Director - Klamath Falls, OR
Forest Stewards Guild
Zander Evans - Executive Director - Madison, WI
Forest Stewardship Council
- Minneapolis, MN
Garden for Wildlife
National Wildlife Federation - Merrifield, VA
George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center (Sutton Center)
- Bartlesville, OK
Great Outdoors Colorado
- Denver, CO
Great Plains Institute for Sustainable Development
Gail Nosek - Communications Director - Minneapolis, MN
Institute for Environmental Solutions
- Denver, CO
Intermountain West Joint Venture
- Missoula, MT
John Sanderson
Center for Collaborative Conservation - Director - Fort Collins, CO
Journey North
- Madison, WI
Keep It Colorado (formerly Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts)
Melissa Daruna - Exeuctive Director - Golden, CO
Land Conservation and Advocacy Trust
Steve Meltzer - Founder and Executive Director - Framingham, MA
Land Trust Alliance
- Washington, DC
Mississippi Wildlife Federation
- Madison , MS
Monarch Joint Venture
- St. Paul, MN
Mule Deer Foundation
- Salt Lake City, UT
MultiState Conservation Grant Program
- Washington, DC, VA
National Association of State Foresters
- Washington , DC
National Audubon Society
- New York, NY
National Family Farm Coaltion
- Washington, DC
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
Jeff Trandahl - Executive Director and CEO - Washington, DC
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation - Rocky Mountain Regional Office
Chris West - Director - Denver, CO
National Forestry Association
Keith A. Argow - President, Director at Large - Vienna, VA
National Grazing Lands Coalition
Monti Golla - National GLC Executive Director - College Station, TX
National Mitigation Banking Association
- Washington, DC
National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition
Jeremy Emmi - Managing Director - Washington, DC
National Trust for Historic Preservation
- Washington, DC
National Wild Turkey Federation
- Edgefield, SC
National Wild Turkey Federation - Colorado State Chapter
Crystal Adams - Regional DirectorCO
National Wildlife Federation
- Reston, VA
NatureServe
Mary Klein - President & CEO - Arlington, VA
No-till on the Plains
- Berryton, KS
Paige Lewis
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director, Forest Health and Fire Initiative in Colorado - Denver, CO
Partners for Conservation
Steve Jester - Executive Director - Pueblo, CO
Partners for Western Conservation
- Arvada, CO
Partners in the Sage
- Missoula, MT
Pheasants Forever
- St Paul, MN
Pinchot Institute for Conservation
V. Alaric Sample - President - Washington, DC
Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV)
- Lafayette, CO
Pollinator Partnership
- San Francisco, CA
Quail and Upland Wildlife Federation, Inc.
Craig A. Alderman - Executive Director - Buffalo, MO
Quality Deer Management Association
- Bogart, GA
Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
- Washington, DC
RiversEdge West
- Grand Junction, CO
Roaring Fork Outdoor Volunteers
J. David Hamilton - Executive Director - Basalt, CO
Sage Grouse Initiative
Tim Griffiths - Coordinator - Bozeman, MT
Sage Grouse Initiative Strategic Watershed Action Team
Dave Smith - Intermountain West Joint Venture (IWJV) Coordinator - Missoula, MT
Sand County Foundation
Kevin Kiley, Development & Communications - Madison, WI
Savory Institute
- Boulder, CO
Soil and Water Conservation Society
- Ankeny, IA
Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development
Judith KohlerCO
Stay The Trail Colorado
Dan Gourley - Program CoordinatorCO
Susan Lohr
Lohr Associates - Grand Junction, CO
Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Kathy Abusow - President and CEO - Washington, DC
Sustainable Forests Roundtable
Tammy VerCauteren
Executive Director, Administration - Prairie Partners Program - Fort Collins, CO
Tax Credit Connection, Inc.
Ariel Steele, Owner - Berthoud, CO
Terrafirma RRG LLC
Jeremy Johnston - Account Administrator, Marsh Captive Solutions - Burlington, VT
Terri Schulz
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director of Landscape Science and Management - Denver, CO
The Climate Trust
- Portland, OR
The Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation
Lindsay Thomas - Chairman - Washington, DC
The Conservation Fund
- Arlington, VA
The Fund for Wild Nature
Jeff Petersen, Esq. - Executive Director - Kelso, WA
The Land Institute
- Salina, KS
The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
- Portland, OR
Three Rivers Alliance
Don Andrews - Chairman - Kirk, CO
Thunder Bay Field Naturalists
Bruce Thacker - President - Thunder Bay, ON
Trout Headwaters, Inc.
- Livingston, MT
Turtle Islands Earth Stewards
Tyhson Banighen - Tappen, BC
U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance (USFRA)
- Chesterfield, MO
Upper Thames River Conservation Authority
Ian Wilcox - General Manager/Secretary-Treasurer - London, ON
USA National Phenology Network
Jake Weltzin - Executive Director - Tucson, AZ
Valleys 2000
Bill Huether - Treasurer - Bowmanville, ON
Ward Burton Wildlife Foundation
- Halifax, VA
Western Aquatic Plant Management Society
- Portland, OR
Western Landowners Alliance
Lesli Allison - Executive Director - Santa Fe, NM
Western Native Trout Initiative
Therese Thompson - Project Coordinator - Lakewood, CO
Western Resource Advocates
Jon Goldin-Dubois - President - Boulder, CO
Western Rivers Conservancy
Sue Doroff - President - Portland, OR
Western Water Project
Scott Yates - Director - Bozeman, MT
Wild Ones
Donna VanBuecken - Executive Director - Neenah, WI
Wildlands Restoration Volunteers
Ed Self - Founder and Executive Director - Boulder, CO
Wildlife Research Institute
- Helena, MT
Women, Food & Agriculture Network
- Ames, IA
Cooperative Extension
Clear Creek County Extension
- Georgetown, CO
CSU Extension
Chaffee County Extension
Anita Miller - Extension Assistant - Salida, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Nursery
- Fort Collins, CO
Eagle County Extension
Donna Boley - Administrative Technician - Eagle, CO
Fremont County Extension
Tommy L. Covington - County Director - Canon City, CO
Gilpin County Extension
Irene Shonle - Director - Black Hawk, CO
Gunnison County Extension
- Gunnison, CO
Park County Extension
- Fairplay, CO
Summit County Extension
Dan Schroder - Extension Agent/County Director - Frisco, CO
Teller County Extension
Mark Platten - County Director - Woodland Park, CO
Department of Interior - Fish and Wildlife Service Programs
Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) Task Force
Dr. Susan Pasko - Executive Secretary, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Falls Church, VA
Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances
US Fish and Wildlife Service - Ecological Services Program - Falls Church, VA
Candidate Conservation Program
US Fish and Wildlife Service - Falls Church, VA
Colorado Ecological Service Field Office - USFWS
- Denver, CO
Colorado Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office
Gregory Gerlich - FAC Assistant Regional Director - Denver, CO
Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund Grants
Region 6 - Mountain Prairie - Lakewood, CO
Fish Passage Program - Mountain-Prairie Region
Bill Rice - Fish Passage Coordinator - Denver, CO
Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Yvette Converse - GNLCC Coordinator - Bozeman, MT
Habitat Conservation Plans
US Fish and Wildlife Service
Landowner Incentive Program
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
MultiState Conservation Grant Program
- Washington, DC, VA
National Fish Passage Program
- Falls Church, VA
Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act Grants Program
Guy Foulks - NMBCA Program Coordinator - Falls Church, VA
North American Wetlands Conservation Act Grants Program
U.S. Department of the Interior - Arlington, VA
North American Wetlands Conservation Act Small Grants Program
Rodecia Mcknight - Small Grants Program Coordinator - Falls Church, VA
North American Wetlands Conservation Act Standard Grants Program
Stacy Sanchez - U.S. Standard Grants Program Proposal Coordinator - Falls Church, VA
Partners For Fish And Wildlife Program - National
See Description
Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program in Colorado
Dominic Barrett  - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  - Lakewood, CO
Safe Harbor Agreements
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Kevin Johnson, SRLCC Coordinator - Fish Wildlife Service - Lakewood, CO
Sport Fish Restoration Program
Karen Big Crow - Fiscal and Grants Management Specialist - Lakewood, CO
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Coastal Program
Samantha Brooke - Coastal Program Team Lead - Falls Church, VA
Western Colorado Field Office
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Grand Junction, CO
Western Regional Air Partnership (WRAP)
Dan Johnson - Executive Director - Seattle, WA
Working Lands for Wildlife
Tim Griffiths - Bozeman, MT
Foresters
Barry Rhea
Rhea Environmental Consulting - Owner, primary consultant - Mancos, CO
Bjorn M. Dahl, ACF
Dahl Environment Services LLC - President - Golden, CO
Bruce Short
Short Forestry LLC - Certified Forester - Mancos, CO
Ceres Landcare
- Eagle, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Golden Field Office
- Golden, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Boulder Field Office
- Longmont, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Cañon City Field Office
- Cañon City, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Fort Collins
- Fort Collins, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Granby Field Office
- Granby, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Gunnison Field Office
- Gunnison, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Salida Field Office
- Salida, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Woodland Park Field Office
- Woodland Park, CO
Council of Western State Foresters
Sara Goodwin - Communications Director - Edgewater, CO
Forest Stewardship Program
- Fort Collins, CO
Grand Junction Field Office of the Colorado State Forest Service
- Grand Junction, CO
Greenleaf Forestry and Wood Products, Inc.
Len Lankford - President and CEO - Westcliffe, CO
Gretchen Cross
Buell Environmental LLC - Forester - Encampment, WY
James E. Ficke, ACF
Natural Resource Consultants - President - Steamboat Springs, CO
James Webb
Forest Stewardship Concepts, Ltd. - Certified Forester - Monte Vista, CO
Jim McGannon
Forestry/Landscape Consultant - Golden, CO
Joe Reddan, ACF
Flexilis Forestry - Principal - Durango, CO
Kit H. Buell
Buell Environmental LLC - Ecologist - Oak Creek, CO
Lawton Grinter
Rocky Mountain Forestry LLC - Certified Forester - Wheat Ridge, CO
Mark Rasmussen
Mason Bruce & Girard Inc. - Forester Planner & Economist - Portland, OR
Markit! Forestry Management
- Colorado Springs, CO
Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc.
James Schriever - Vice President Geospatial Services - Woodland Park, CO
Southwestern Environmental Consultants, Inc.
- Sedona, AZ
TigerTree Land Management
Franz Lani - Laramie, WY
Land Trusts
American Farmland Trust
- Washington, DC
Aspen Valley Land Trust
Erin Quinn - Conservation Director - Carbondale, CO
Black Canyon Regional Land Trust
- Montrose, CO
Central Colorado Conservancy
- Salida, CO
Clear Creek Land Conservancy
- Golden, CO
Colorado Cattlemen's Agricultural Land Trust
Erik Glenn - Executive Director - Arvada, CO
Colorado Open Lands
Tony Caligiuri - President and CEO - Lakewood, CO
Colorado Trail Foundation
Bill Manning - Executive Director - Golden, CO
Colorado West Land Trust
Rob Bleiberg - Executive Director - Grand Junction, CO
Colorado Wildlife Heritage Foundation
Matthew Hudson - Executive Director - Denver, CO
Continental Divide Land Trust
Rachel Winkler - Program Manager - Frisco, CO
Crested Butte Land Trust
Claire Karban - Outreach Coordinator - Crested Butte, CO
Eagle Valley Land Trust
Jim Daus - Executive Director - Edwards, CO
Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy
Stacy McPhail - Executive Director - Gunnison, CO
John Sanderson
Center for Collaborative Conservation - Director - Fort Collins, CO
Keep It Colorado (formerly Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts)
Melissa Daruna - Exeuctive Director - Golden, CO
La Plata Open Space Conservancy
Patrick Barker - Executive Director - Durango, CO
Lake Fork Valley Conservancy
Camille Richard - Executive Director - Lake City, CO
Margo Heekin
- Land Trust Consultant - Fort Bragg, CA
Mountain Area Land Trust
- Evergreen, CO
North American Land Trust
Monica McQuail - Communications & Stewardship Assistant - Chadds Ford, PA
Palmer Land Trust
Stephanie Thomas - Director of Land Stewardship - Colorado Springs, CO
Peter D. Nichols
Berg Hill Greenleaf Ruscitti, LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
Rio Grande Headwaters Land Trust
Nancy Butler - Director - del Norte, CO
Roaring Fork Conservancy
Rick Lofaro - Executive Director - Basalt, CO
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
- Missoula, MT
Sage Advisors
Stephen Thor Johnson - Principal/Owner - West Chester, PA
San Isabel Land Protection Trust
Ben Lenth - Executive Director - Westcliffe, CO
Sportsmen's National Land Trust
- Agawam, MA
The Greenlands Reserve
- Frisco, CO
The Nature Conservancy, Colorado Field Office
Nancy Fishbein - Director of Land Conservation - Boulder, CO
The Wilderness Land Trust
Brad Borst - President - Bainbridge Island, WA
Trust for Public Land, Colorado Office
- Denver, CO
Trust for Public Land, Washington State Office
- Seattle, WA
Watershed Land Trust
Frank Austenfeld, J.D. - Executive Director - Belton, MO
Local Working Groups
Crawford area Gunnison Sage-grouse Working Group
Nathan Seward - Conservation Biologist - Gunnison, CO
Gunnison Basin Sage Grouse Working Group
Nathan Seward - Conservation Biologist - Gunnison, CO
Keep It Colorado (formerly Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts)
Melissa Daruna - Exeuctive Director - Golden, CO
Middle Park Sage Grouse Committee
Michelle Cowardin - Conservation Biologist - Hot Sulphur Springs, CO
Northern Eagle - Southern Routt Work Group
Liza Rossi - Conservation Biologist - Steamboat Springs, CO
Mitigation Banks
Bio-Logical Capital
Grant McCargo - Managing Director, Founder and CEO - Denver, CO
Eco-Asset Solutions & Innovations LLC
William Coleman - Co-Founder & CEO - Redwood City, CA
Finger Rock Preserve, LLC.
Ren Martyn - Steamboat Springs, CO
Front Range Umbrella Mitigation Bank
Restoration Systems, LLC - Ray Holz - Raleigh, NC
Resource Environmental Solutions, LLC
Ross Guidry - Region Land Manager - Lafayette, LA
Westervelt Ecological Services
Lucy Harrington - Rocky Mountain Regional Manager - Centennial, CO
Natural Resource Law Attorneys
Alison E. Wente
Holland & Hart LLP - Associate - Aspen, CO
Allan Beezley
Allan C. Beezley, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Amanda Hemmerich
Burns, Figa & Will - Associate - Greenwood Village, CO
Beth Appleton
Elizabeth P. Appleton, PC - Crested Butte, CO
Blair Schilling
Fishman Haygood, LLP - Attorney - New Orleans, LA
Bradley Raffle
Conservation Capital - CEO - Eugene, OR
Bradley Switzer
Law Offices of Bradley N. Switzer - Montrose, CO
Brandon L. Jensen
Budd–Falen Law Offices, LLC - Senior Associate - Cheyenne, WY
Cameron A. Grant
Lyons Gaddis Kahn Hall Jeffers Dworak & Grant PC - Longmont, CO
Christina R. Sloan
The Sloan Law Firm, PLLC - Moab, UT
Christopher G. Hayes
The Hayes Law Firm LLC - Denver, CO
Christopher R. Stork
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
Conservation Law Center
- Bloomington, IN
Daniel F. Fitzgerald
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Danielle L. Van Arsdale
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
David C. Conley, PC
- Colorado Springs, CO
David F. Bower
Johnson & Repucci LLP - Louisville, CO
David L. Kuosman
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
David Lawrence Kueter
Holsinger Law, LLC - Attorney - Denver, CO
David P. Claiborne
Sawtooth Law Offices, PLLC - Principal - Boise, ID
Debra A. Conroy
Keller Law, LLC - Craig, CO
Endangered Species Law and Policy Group
Nossaman LLP - Los Angeles, CA
Ernie F. Fazekas
Folkestad Fazekas Barrick & Patoile, P.C. - Castle Rock, CO
Ezekiel (Zeke) J. Williams
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese, PC - Denver, CO
Franklin J. Falen
Budd-Falen Law Offices, L.L.C. - Cheyenne, WY
Gabriella Stockmayer
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Gary L. Greer
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Gregory A. Vallin
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP - Denver, CO
Gregory J Cucrola
Law Offices of Gregory J Cucarola - Sterling, CO
Gregory K. Hoskin
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Harvey W. Curtis
Harvey W. Curtis & Associates - Englewood, CO
Jack D. Palma, II
Holland & Hart LLP - Of Counsel - Cheyenne, WY
James M. Ash
Husch Blackwell LLP - Kansas City, MO
James P. Moorhead
Moorhead Law Group, LLC - Founder and Principal - Chicago, IL
Jason M. Groves
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
Jenifer E. Scoggin
Holland & Hart LLP - Of Counsel - Cheyenne, WY
Jenna H. Keller
Keller Law, LLC - Craig, CO
Jessica E. Jay
Conservation Law, P.C - Attorney at Law - Evergreen, CO
John H. Birkeland
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
John P. Justus
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Karl F. Kumli III
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Kate Ryan
Berg Hill Greenleaf Ruscitti - Attorney - Boulder, CO
Kellie Nelson Fetter
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Kent Holsinger
Holsinger Law, LLC - Denver, CO
Kevin L. Patrick
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Waterlaw - Aspen, CO
L. Richard (Dick) Bratton
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, Professional Corporation - Gunnison, CO
Laurie A. Cahill
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Lawrence Kueter
The Law Office of Lawrence R. Kueter - Attorney - Denver, CO
Leah K. Martinsson
Berg Hill Greenleaf & Ruscitti LLP - Special Counsel - Boulder, CO
Lee Fanyo
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese P.C. - Denver, CO
Lori Potter
Kaplan, Kirsch, Rockwell LLP - Partner - Denver, CO
M. Reed Hopper
Pacific Legal Foundation - Principal Attorney, National Litigation Center - Sacramento, CA
Mark D. Detsky
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Meghan N. Winokur
Holland & Hart LLP - Associate - Aspen, CO
Melinda Beck
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese P.C. - Denver, CO
Misti Schmidt
Conservation Partners LLP - Partner - Oakland, CA
Mountain States Legal Foundation
William Perry Pendley - President and COO - Lakewood, CO
Murray D. Feldman
Holland & Hart - Partner - Boise, ID
Nicholas G. Muller
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Paul L. Noto
Patrick, Miller aned Noto - Basalt, CO
Paul M. Seby
Holland & Hart - Partner - Denver, CO
Paul Sachs P.C.
- Attorney at Law - Steamboat Springs, CO
Pete F. Michaelson
Law Office of Peter F. Michaelson, P.C. - Westcliffe, CO
Peter D. Nichols
Berg Hill Greenleaf Ruscitti, LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
Peter G. Koclanes
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Peter Thomas, Esq
Praxidice Law - Principal and Founder - Aspen, CO
Polly Jessen
Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell LLP - Partner - Denver, CO
Rebecca Hall
Packard and Dierking, LLC - Boulder, CO
Richard L. Emmett
- Durango, CO
Richard L. Reichstei
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
Robert Noone
Noone Law Firm - Glenwood Springs, CO
Ronald M. Eddy
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Sandra A. Snodgrass
Holland & Hart LLP - Partner - Denver, CO
Sara J Streight LLC
Attorney - Fort Collins, CO
Sarah Rockwell
Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell LLP - Partner - Denver, CO
Scott C. Miller
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
Scott Clark
Burns, Figa & Will - Shareholder - Greenwood Village, CO
Star L. Waring
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Stephen J. Small, Esq.
Law Office of Stephen J. Small, Esq., P.C. - Cambridge, MA
Steven J. Bushong
Porzak, Browning & Bushong, LLP - Boulder, CO
Steven J. Shimberg
SJSolutions - Washington , DC
Steven K. Imig
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese - Denver, CO
Steven P. Jeffers
Lyons Gaddis Kahn Hall Jeffers Dworak & Grant PC - Longmont, CO
Thomas J Ragonetti
Otten, Johnson, Robinson, Neff & Ragonetti PC - Shareholder - Denver, CO
Tim Whitsitt
Whitsitt & Gross PC - Carbondale, CO
W. Alan Schroeder
Schroeder Law - Lawyer/owner - Boise, ID
William A. Hillhouse II
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
William G. Myers III
Holland & Hart - Partner - Boise, ID
William H. Caile
Holland & Hart - Of Counsel - Denver, CO
William Hutton
Conservation Partners LLP - Of Council - Oakland, CA
William Myers III
Holland & Hart - Boise, ID
William Silberstein
Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell - Partner - Denver, CO
Willis V. Carpenter
Carpenter & Klatskin, P.C. - Denver, CO
State Funding / Technical Resources
Colorado Building Farmers
Project Director - Dawn Thilmany - Longmont, CO
Colorado Department of Agriculture
Don Brown - Commissioner - Broomfield, CO
Colorado Environmental Pesticide Education Program
Colorado State University - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Forest Legacy Program
Joseph A. Duda - Dupty State Forester - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Forest Products Program
Kristina Hughes - Program Administrator - Broomfield, CO
Colorado Natural Heritage Program
David Anderson - Director and Chief Scientist - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission
- Denver, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Golden Field Office
- Golden, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Boulder Field Office
- Longmont, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Cañon City Field Office
- Cañon City, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Granby Field Office
- Granby, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Salida Field Office
- Salida, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Woodland Park Field Office
- Woodland Park, CO
Colorado Tree Farm Program
- Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Wetlands for Wildlife Program
Brian Sullivan - Wetlands Program Coordinator - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Wildlife Habitat Protection Program
Amanda Nims - Denver, CO
Colorado Wood Utilization and Marketing Program
Susan Matthews - Forest Management Division Supervisor - Fort Collins, CO
Conservation Services Division - Colorado Department of Agriculture
Cindy Lair - State Conservation Program Manager - Broomfield, CO
Cooperative Habitat Improvement Program (CHIP)
Colorado Division of Wildlife - Fort Collins, CO
Forest Agricultural Classification Program
Colorado State Forest Service - Fort Collins, CO
Forest Stewardship Program
- Fort Collins, CO
Game Damage Program
Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Denver, CO
Grand Junction Field Office of the Colorado State Forest Service
- Grand Junction, CO
Habitat Partnership Program
Pat Tucker - Colorado Parks & Wildlife, State Coordinator - Grand Junction, CO
Hunter Education Shooting Range Small Grant Program
Todd Schmidt, Hunter Education Coordinator - Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Denver, CO
Lesser Prairie Chicken Habitat Improvement Program (LPCHIP)
Colorado Parks and WildlifeCO
Lesser Prairie Chicken Range-wide Conservation Plan
Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies - Boise, ID
Petroleum Storage Tank Fund
- Denver, CO
Ranching for Wildlife
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Denver, CO
Recovery & Conservation Plans
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Denver, CO
Southern Rockies Fire Science Network (SRFSN)
Gloria Edwards, SRFSN Program Coordinator - Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship - Fort Collins, CO
Tammy VerCauteren
Executive Director, Administration - Prairie Partners Program - Fort Collins, CO
The Conservation Plan for Grassland Species
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Denver, CO
Walk-in Access Program
Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Denver, CO
Wetland Wildlife Conservation Program
Brian Sullivan, Wetlands Program Coordinator - Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Fort Collins, CO
USDA - FSA Programs
Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Biomass Crop Assistance Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Conservation Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Farm Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Forest Restoration Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Farm Operating Loans & Microloans
USDA Farm Service Agency - Washington, DC
Farm Ownership Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Farmable Wetlands Program (FWP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Grassland Reserve Program- REPEALED
USDA Farm Service Agency
Guaranteed Farm Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Livestock Forage Disaster Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Livestock Indemnity Program
USDA FSA
Microloans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Minority and Women Farmers and Ranchers Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency - Washington, DC
Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program
Source Water Protection Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
State Acres for Wildlife Enhancement
USDA Farm Service Agency - Washington, DC
Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments (SURE) Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Transition Incentives Program (TIP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Tree Assistance Program (TAP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
USDA Colorado Farm Service Agency (FSA)
Clarice Navarro - Denver, CO
USDA StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity
- Washington, DC
USDA - NRCS Programs
Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP)
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Agricultural Water Enhancement Program (AWEP)- REPEALED
Mark Parson - Program Contact
Colorado Conservation Stewardship Program
Eugene Backhaus - State Resource Conservationist - Denver, CO
Colorado Environmental Quality Incentives Program
Sarah Brooks - FA Program Manager - Denver, CO
Colorado Grassland Reserve Program
- Denver, CO
Colorado Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP)
Dawn Jackson - NRCS Colorado Assistant State Conservationist - Denver, CO
Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG)
- Washington, DC
Conservation of Private Grazing Land (CPGL)
Conservation Security Program
Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP)
Conservation Technical Assistance (CTA)
NRCS
Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative (CCPI)- REPEALED
Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP)
Fred Reaves - National Emergency Watershed Protection Program Manager
Emergency Watershed Protection Program- Floodplain Easement
Jason Weller, Chief - USDA-NRCS - Washington, DC
Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP)
USDA NRCS
EQIP Organic Initiative
Lindsay Haines - EQIP Specialist for Organic
Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program (FRPP)- REPEALED
Farm Pilot Project Coordination, Inc.
- Tampa, FL
Grassland Reserve Program (GRP) REPEALED
Healthy Forests Reserve Program (HFRP)
USDA NRCS
James E. 'Bud' Smith Plant Materials Center
Brandon Carr - PMC Manager - Knox City, TX
Los Lunas Plant Materials Center
Bernadette Cooney - PMC Manager - Los Lunas, NM
Manhattan Plant Materials Center
Fred Cummings - PMC Manager - Manhattan, KS
National Water Quality Initiative
USDA NRCS
Norman A Berg National Plant Materials Center
David Kidwell-Slak - PMC Manager - Beltsville, MD
Ogallala Aquifer Initiative
Barry Frantz - Coordinator - Washington, DC
Platte River Ag Services, Inc.
Ron Zurlinden, P.E. - Owner - Golden, CO
Regional Conservation Partnership Program
- Washington, DC
Small scale solutions for your farm
USDA - NRCS - Washington, DC
The Lesser Prairie Chicken Initiative
USDA-NRCS - Marysville, KS
USDA StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity
- Washington, DC
USDA-NRCS Colorado
Clint Evans - State Conservationist (STC) - Denver, CO
Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentives Program (VPA-HIP)
NRCS
Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program (WREP)- REPEALED
Garry Lee - Acting Director, Easement Programs Division - Washington, DC
Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP)- REPEALED
- Washington, DC
Working Lands for Wildlife
Tim Griffiths - Bozeman, MT
USDA Programs - Other
Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Development Program
Denis Ebodaghe - National Program Leader - Division of Agricultural Systems - Kansas City, MO
Celebrate Urban Birds
Cornell Lab of Ornithology - Ithaca, NY
Conservation Reserve Program Longleaf Pine Initiative
Farm Labor Housing Loans and Grants
USDA Rural Development
Farmers Market Promotion Program
Douglas Keeler, Director - Farmers Markets and Local Food Marketing
Food Linc
Jim Barham - USDA Rural Development - Washington, DC
Local Food Promotion Program
Nicole Nelson Miller - LFPP Program Manager - Washington, DC
New Farmers
USDA
Organic Certification Cost Share Programs
Rita Meade - OCCSP Coordinator - Washington, DC
Rural Development Loan Programs
USDA Rural Development - Washington, DC
Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program
Lori Washington - USDA Rural Development Loan Specialist
The Advanced Biofuel Payment Program
Business and Cooperative Programs - National Office, USDA Rural Development - Washington, DC
The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP)
USDA Rural Development - Renewable Energy Systems & Energy Efficiency Improvement Guaranteed Loans & Grants - Washington, DC
USDA StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity
- Washington, DC
Value-Added Producer Grant Program
USDA Office of Rural Development
Western SARE
Teryl R. Roper - Regional Coordinator - Logan, UT
Wildlife / Habitat Specialists
Barry Rhea
Rhea Environmental Consulting - Owner, primary consultant - Mancos, CO
Basin Wildlife Consulting
Rick Danvir - Casper, WY
Conservation Science Partners - Colorado Headquarters
Brett Dickson, PhD - President & Chief Scientist - Fort Collins, CO
Dan Prenzlow
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Southeast Region Manager - Colorado Springs, CO
Dawn Reeder
Rare Earth Sciences, LLC - Principal Biologist - Paonia, CO
Ecoresource Solutions Inc
Tony Byrne - President/Principal Ecologist - Arvada, CO
ESCO Associates Inc.
David Buckner, PhD - Boulder, CO
Frederick Environmental Consulting, LLC
David Frederick - Pagosa Springs, CO
George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center (Sutton Center)
- Bartlesville, OK
Greg Simons
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Wildlife Biologist - San Angelo, TX
Headwaters Partners, LLC
Travis Morse - Denver, CO
Kit H. Buell
Buell Environmental LLC - Ecologist - Oak Creek, CO
Lannie B. Philley, AFM
Delta Land & Farm Mgmt Co, LLC - Appraiser, Manager - Mer Rouge, LA
Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc.
James Schriever - Vice President Geospatial Services - Woodland Park, CO
Patty Knupp
Area Biologist - USDA-NRCS Area Three Office - Pueblo, CO
Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV)
- Lafayette, CO
Robert Veldman
K·Coe Conservation - Land Consultant - Loveland, CO
Roe Ecological Services, LLC
Chris and Kelly Roe - Logan, KS
Roger Wolfe
Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies - Lesser Prairie Chicken Program Manager - Topeka, KS
Ruben Cantu
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Certified Wildlife Biologist, Certified Professional Rangeland Management - San Angelo, TX
Seth Gallagher
Sage Grouse Initiative - Field Capacity and Delivery Coordinator - Fort Collins, CO
SME Environmental, Inc.
Sean Moore - Principal - Durango, CO
Society for Range Management
- Littleton, CO
Steve Boyle
BIO-Logic, Inc. - Principal & Senior Biologist - Montrose, CO
Terri Schulz
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director of Landscape Science and Management - Denver, CO

 Wildlife Best Management Practices

   
Show Articles on Wildlife Best Management Practices (22)
Mowing and Management: Best Practices for Monarchs
By:

Understanding when monarchs are present allows land managers to time management practices like burning, mowing, grazing, or targeted pesticide application when they are least likely to harm monarchs.

 

Better Grazing Through Burning
By:

“The prairie has to have fire or it’s going to be gone—we’re going to lose it to the encroachment of trees.” Those are the words of rancher Ed Koger of southwest Kansas.

 

Fire Effects Information System

The Fire Effects Information System is an online collection of reviews of the scientific literature about fire effects on plants and animals and about fire regimes of plant communities in the United States. FEIS reviews are based on thorough literature searches, often supplemented with insights from field scientists and managers. FEIS provides reviews that are efficient to use, thoroughly documented, and defensible. Approximately 15 to 30 new or revised reviews are published in FEIS each year. There are 3 types of FEIS reviews:

  1. Species Reviews 
  2. Fire Studies 
  3. Fire Regime Syntheses 

 

Reducing Conflict with Grizzly Bears, Wolves and Elk A Western Landowners’ Guide
By:

This guide has been produced by and for landowners and practitioners constructively engaged in one of the greatest conservation challenges of our time—how to share and manage a wild, working landscape that sustains both people and wildlife.

 

Integrating Bird Conservation into Range Management

This manual is designed to assist resource professionals with integrating birds and their habitat needs into range management and monitoring, and to train landowners and land managers to do the same.& ...

 

Sharing Your Land with Prairie Wildlife
By:

This third edition of this manual (formerly entitled Sharing Your Land With Shortgrass Prairie Birds) is about how to help birds and other wildlife make a living from the land while you do the same.

 

Best Management Practices for Shortgrass Prairie Birds
By:

The information in this guide is designed to guide you in creating and maintaining habitat for 13 bird species of the shortgrass prairie, birds that are in need of conservation efforts.

 

Decontamination Documentation for Cavers
By:

The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) strongly recommends, first and foremost, compliance with all cave closures, advisories, and regulations in all Federal, State,Tribal, and private lands.

 

Bird Conservation in Private Ponderosa Pine Forests

American Bird Conservancy (ABC), in cooperation with the American Forest Foundation, Forest Restoration Partnership, and several other partners, is working with private landowners to implement bird conservation  measures in ponderosa pine habitat throughout the western United States.

 

Working Lands For Wildlife
By:

Through Working Lands for Wildlife —a voluntary, incentive-based effort—the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and its conservation partners will provide landowners with technical and financial assistance to: Restore populations of declining wildlife species.

 

CP 33 Habitat Buffers for Upland Birds

CP-33 Habitat Buffers for Upland Birds is available under the United States Department of Agriculture Continuous Conservation Reserve Program (CCRP).

 

Greater Sage-grouse Comprehensive Conservation Strategy
By:

This Strategy outlines the critical need to develop the associations among local, state, provincial, tribal, and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individual citizens to design and implement cooperative actions to support robust populations of sage-grouse and the landscapes and habitats upon which they depend.

 

Watering Facility Wildlife Escape Ladder Design

 

Recommendations for Responsible Oil and Gas Development
By:

This report outlines sportsmen’s recommendations for responsible energy development in the Rocky Mountain West—a platform and prescription for development that accommodates our energy needs without sacrificing our Western heritage.

 

Conserving lands and prosperity - Seeking a proper balance between conservation and development in the Rocky Mountain West
By:

More than half of the land in the Western United states is managed by state and federal governments (Jackson, 1995). Public lands in the seven Rocky Mountain States alone cover an area roughly 7.5 ...

 

A Landowner's Guide to Wildlife Friendly Fences - How to Build Fence with Wildlife in Mind
By:

 

A Landowner's Guide to Fences and Wildlife - Practical Tips to Make Your Fences Wildlife Friendly
By:

Wyoming Edition  

 

Conservation Assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and Sagebrush Habitats
By:

In this report, the authors assessed the ecological status and potential factors that influenced greater sage-grouse and sagebrush habitats across their entire distribution.& ...

 

Strategies for Managing the Effects of Climate Change on Wildlife and Ecosystems

From The Heinz Center, this 2008 lengthy publication is targeted to land managers who practice adaptive management.

 

Prescribed Fire Associations
By:

A Prescribed Fire Association is a group of landowners and other concerned citizens that form a partnership to conduct prescribed burns. Prescribed burning is the key land management tool used to restore and maintain native plant communities to their former diversity and productivity for livestock production and wildlife habitat.

 

National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative Unified Strategy to Restore Wild Quail
By:

Northern Bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) were once common, even abundant, on farms, rangelands and forests across more than 30 states. Bobwhites have declined an average of 3% per year since 1966, and have virtually disappeared from some northern states.

 

Ecosystem services provided by bats
By:

Review of the available literature on the ecological and economic impact of ecosystem services provided by  bats.

 

 Wildlife Conservation Strategy

   
Show Articles on Wildlife Conservation Strategy (6)
Using Existing Tools to Expand Cooperative Conservation for Candidate Species Across Federal and Non-Federal Lands
By:

For many years the Service has worked with partners to help them develop Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCAs). CCAs primarily have been developed by Federal agencies to cover Federal lands, and several have resulted in conservation efforts that made listing unnecessary.

 

The 2016 Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Conservation Plan Annual Progress Report
By:

In 2014, a new era in wildlife conservation was ushered in with the implementation of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (LPC) Range-wide Conservation Plan (Van Pelt et al.

 

Conserving Wildlife and Crucial Habitat in the West
By:

Policy Resolution 13-04: Western Governors direct the Western Governors’ Wildlife Council to continue its guidance in the development, management and implementation with partners of the state and West-wide CHATs.

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Predictability FAQs
By:

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Implementation Process
By:

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Greater Sage-Grouse
By:

FAQs Including CCAA and SGI Comparison

 

 

 Local News Stories about Wildlife

Local Wildlife Conservation Strategy News Items
Video highlights the exciting arctic grayling spawn at Joe Wright Reservoir
7/7/2020 12:39:41 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Jason Clay Northeast Region Public Information Officer 303-291-7234 / jason.clay@state.co.us   @CPW_NE Video highlights the exciting arctic grayling spawn at Joe Wright Reservoir Aquatic biologist Kyle Battige shorts the arctic grayling into two different holding containers of males and females [WATCH]  https://youtu.be/LuJif1T3oDs LARIMER COUNTY, Colo. - Just upstream of Joe Wright Reservoir, Colorado Parks and Wildlife aquatic biologists, technicians, researchers and hatchery personnel conducted its annual spawning operation for a fish that most Coloradans might be surprised to find here in the Rocky Mountains. Arctic grayling were first stocked in Colorado in the late 1890s, but it wasn't until the mid-1960s that CPW had success with a self-sustaining population.  This year’s arctic grayling spawning operation was conducted June 23 on Joe Wright Creek. Aquatic biologists from CPW’s Northeast Region have been coming to this spot every year since 1994 to collect and fertilize grayling eggs to deliver to the Glenwood Springs State Fish Hatchery. The annual egg request has ranged from 100,000 to 275,00 grayling eggs over the last decade, with 100,000 eggs needed for 2020. “They will get stocked out at various lakes throughout the state,” Aquatic Biologist Kyle Battige said. “It depends on the year, but we generally stock between 5-10 lakes around the state of Colorado with grayling.” The goal of the 2020 spawn was to catch around 100 ripe females via electrocking near the creek’s inlet to the reservoir to meet the established egg quota. However, the spawning operation entails far greater numbers of fish. “In the quarter-mile of stream we shocked today, we caught almost 1,000 grayling,” Battige said. “Arctic grayling are not native to Colorado, the fish here in Joe Wright Reservoir originally came from Montana. They’ve been in Joe Wright Reservoir for about 30 years, we have been spawning them for over two decades now and there is an annual spawning run that is just a spectacle to see.” If you came up to Joe Wright Creek during any other time of the year than during the spawning run, you likely would not find a single grayling in the creek. Joe Wright Reservoir and Creek provide a unique habitat for them. The arctic grayling population in Joe Wright Reservoir is not stocked and is maintained solely through natural reproduction from fish spawning naturally in the creek. “Grayling do really well in Joe Wright Reservoir and Creek because it is crystal clear, great mountain water with appropriately-sized spawning gravel,” Battige said. “They run up the creek out of the reservoir towards the end of June every year, spawn, and then migrate back downstream to the reservoir where they spend the other 11 months of the year.” The fish that are caught via electroshocking are sorted by males and females into holding nets on the creek. The females are massaged and stripped of their roe, or eggs, and the males of their milt, or semen, which are then carefully mixed in plastic tubs with filtered creek water. Once fertilized, the eggs are sent to the Glenwood Springs State Fish Hatchery. The fertilized eggs will be hatched and raised at the hatchery then stocked out in the fall as one to two inch fish. Grayling are in the salmonid family - they are related to trout - and have tasty white meat. CPW has always made an effort to offer anglers a wide variety of fishing opportunities when it comes to sport fish, and the arctic grayling is rather extraordinary. “They are really pretty fish, but don’t get that big in Colorado,” Battige said. “A really big grayling in Colorado would be around 16 inches, but they just provide a unique angling opportunity. They are a lot different than a rainbow or a brown trout. The males this time of year have an elongated dorsal fin that gets really colorful.” The state record for biggest grayling was caught in Jackson County on Lower Big Creek Lake in 2002. Derik Drinnen caught a 17 ¼-inch grayling weighing one pound, 10 ounces. Other grayling waters across Colorado include Pearl Lake north of Steamboat Springs, Silver Lake and Bonham Reservoir in Mesa County and Pomeroy Lake near Salida.  The Colorado Fishing Atlas , the latest interactive mapping tool offered by CPW, allows users to search for fishing opportunities by species, specific interest or proximity to your home or destination. Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 7/7/2020 10:37 AM

Northeast Colorado anglers invited to CPW ZOOM meeting on fishing issues
7/6/2020 5:24:41 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Jason Clay Northeast Region Public Information Officer 303-291-7234 / jason.clay@state.co.us   @CPW_NE Northeast Colorado anglers invited to CPW ZOOM meeting on fishing issues DENVER - Discussion of proposed changes to statewide fishing regulations will top the agenda when Colorado Parks and Wildlife hosts its Northeast Angler Meeting, July 15, using a public Zoom online webinar platform. The 90-minute meeting will begin promptly at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, July 15, and end at 7:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend online, but must register in advance at this link:  https://cpw-state-co.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_VqqWnlKhST6VO9VOmR3ImQ . After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Northeast Region aquatic biologists will make presentations on management topics in the regions. That discussion will be followed by proposed changes to statewide regulations. The webinar will give anglers the opportunity to ask questions about fishery management in rivers, lakes and streams across CPW’s Northeast Region. “This opportunity gives both biologists and anglers the chance to interact,” said Jeff Spohn, Senior Aquatic Biologist for the Northeast Region. “We are looking forward to the evening and discussion.” Two proposed statewide regulation changes will be explained during the webinar. One would set clear guidelines for when emergency fishing closures can be implemented when environmental conditions could potentially damage fish populations. It was drafted after the 2018 drought raised agency awareness of specific challenges with the current closure criteria. The other statewide regulatory change will expand spearfishing opportunities in Colorado. The webinar will be conducted using the Zoom platform and is available on personal computers, smartphones or via call-in telephone access.  After brief staff presentations, the meeting will be open for attendees to ask questions or submit comments on the proposals. Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 7/6/2020 3:22 PM

Operation Dry Water aims to reduce boating under the influence this holiday weekend
7/2/2020 5:19:41 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Rebecca Ferrell Public Information and Website Manager 720-595-1449 / rebecca.ferrell@state.co.us Operation Dry Water aims to reduce boating under the influence this holiday weekend Colorado Parks and Wildlife will be a part of Operation Dry Water July 3-July 5, with increased patrols to enforce boating under the influence (BUI) laws over the holiday weekend.  DENVER – Boaters heading out onto Colorado waters this weekend will see additional Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers enforcing boating under the influence (BUI) laws as part of the national  Operation Dry Water  campaign from July 3-July 5. This three-day enforcement operation is timed closely to the July 4th holiday each year and is designed to both educate boaters on the dangers of boating under the influence, as well as reduce the number of accidents and deaths related to alcohol and drug use on our waterways. "It's so important for people to understand the dangers of drinking and boating, especially heading into a busy holiday season," says Grant Brown, Colorado’s Boating Safety Program Manager. "Alcohol use is the leading factor in recreational boating deaths in the United States. CPW wants Colorado boaters to get out on the water and have a great time, but you have to do so responsibly. At a minimum, you may receive a citation, but there's a chance that serious injuries can also happen. Your adult beverages will be waiting when you get back to shore - taking chances with other people's lives just isn’t worth it.” Operation Dry Water’s mission is to raise awareness among recreational boaters about the dangers and consequences of boating under the influence, which include: Alcohol impairs judgment, balance, vision and reaction time; on the water, that can increase fatigue and susceptibility to the effects of cold-water immersion. Sun, wind, noise, vibration and motion are added factors found in a boating environment; all of these intensify the effects of alcohol, drugs, and some medications. A general rule to remember is that one drink on land is equivalent to three drinks on the water. Alcohol can be dangerous for passengers, too. Intoxication on board can cause injuries from slips, falls overboard, and other dangerous accidents. Penalties for boating under the influence include receiving fines, having your boat impounded, potential jail time and loss of boating privileges. Boaters with a blood alcohol content (BAC) level above the .08 state limit should expect to be arrested for BUI. In Colorado, Operation Dry Water operations will include increased patrols, breathalyzer tests, and checkpoints as well as boater education and outreach. Despite increased patrol activity, the best enforcement tool CPW has is hearing from other boaters out on the water. “If you're on the water and see other boaters drinking while manning their boat, or acting dangerously on their watercraft, please let us know,” says Brown. “Just as you'd call 911 to report a drunk driver, calling 911 to report drinking and boating allows dispatch to get the nearest authorities out to help eliminate potential safety issues for your family and fellow boaters." The dangers of operating under the influence of marijuana are the same as those from alcohol, and the penalties are identical for either substance.  Open display or use of marijuana is illegal on public property, which includes many of the lakes, reservoirs and rivers in Colorado.   Learn more about the consequences of boating under the influence at  www.operationdrywater.org . For more information on boating safety, visit cpw.state.co.us . ### Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 7/2/2020 3:18 PM

Innovative Shooting Clays Courses Open at Cameo
7/2/2020 3:04:41 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Randy Hampton Northwest Region Public Information Officer 970-640-1647 / randy.hampton@state.co.us INNOVATIVE SPORTING CLAYS COURSES OPEN AT CAMEO Shooters checking out the sporting clays courses at Cameo Shooting and Education Complex GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Are you ready to try the sport that some people say is “like golf with guns?” Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Cameo Shooting and Education Complex (CSEC) has two new sporting clays courses that are now open to the public.   These courses were crafted by legendary designer Neil Chadwick, who was inducted into the National Sporting Clays Association Hall of Fame in 2016. Chadwick and equipment guru Corey Howell of Howell Shooting Supplies thoughtfully laid out the two courses to challenge all levels of shooters. The South Course has 15 shooting stations, while the North Course has eight stations. Each station features trap shooting launchers which are hidden by the rugged terrain at Cameo making for an exciting outing for shotgunners from around the world.  The sporting clays course cost is 40 cents per clay (plus tax) or 30 cents per clay for annual pass holders. For the rest of the facility, there is a day use fee of $12 per person or an annual pass is available for $150. The day use and annual passes provide access to rifle sight-in bays, pistol bays, archery lanes, 3-D archery target loops, and a long-range rifle range that is available on specific days. Later this year, CSEC will be adding a mountain bike biathlon course. “This is really a world-class shooting facility right here in the Grand Valley,” said Walt Proulx, CPW Range Coordinator. “Because COVID restrictions have limited international visitors and postponed some of the national events at the site, now is a great time for people in the area to check out what we’ve got to offer.” The CSEC is located off Interstate 70 at Exit 45 in Debeque Canyon, just three miles east of Palisade.  Sporting clays courses are open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reservations are not currently needed and courses are available on a first-come-first-served basis. Side-by-side OHVs which seat six people are available to rent for $25 plus $5 per additional adult. Shooters will need to bring their own shotguns and ammunition (7 1/2 or smaller shot, 2 3/4 inch shells - no magnums). Full range rules are available on the CSEC website .   The Cameo Shooting and Education Complex is open daily from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. through mid-October with shorter daylight hours in the winter.  ###   Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 7/2/2020 1:02 PM

First fishing trip post-pandemic illustrates the beauty of State Wildlife Areas and the need to protect them via hunting, fishing license sales
7/2/2020 1:04:41 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Bill Vogrin Southeast Region Public Information Officer 719-466-3927 / bill.vogrin@state.co.us FIELD NOTES OF A COLORADO SPORTSPERSON – First fishing trip post-pandemic illustrates the beauty of State Wildlife Areas and the need to protect them via hunting, fishing license sales Travis Duncan casts into the Middle Fork of the South Platte River as it runs through the Badger Basin State Wildlife Area in Park County. Photo courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife / Jamey Hastings July 2, 2020 By Travis Duncan Colorado Parks and Wildlife HARTSEL, Colo. – The world sure feels like it has changed a lot since my last Field Notes column back in early March. Since then, many of us have adapted to life in the “new normal” as each day brings updated developments in the global COVID-19 pandemic. I, like many in Colorado, cancelled my out-of-state vacation plans in June due to pandemic concerns. Instead, my family decided to stay closer to home, opting for a few days of fishing at CPW wildlife areas in the South Park area.    It was a good time to go. As a public information officer with CPW, I’ve been answering quite a few questions from the public about a new rule that started July 1 requiring all visitors to Colorado’s State Wildlife Areas (SWA) to hold a valid hunting or fishing license to access the more than 350 of these properties in Colorado.  Colorado’s SWAs are acquired with license dollars from hunters and anglers – and are managed with that funding today – primarily to restore, conserve, manage and enhance wildlife and wildlife habitat.  Across the state, CPW has seen increasing use of state wildlife areas inconsistent with their purpose. A good example is camping, including people taking up temporary residence in SWAs. We’ve also seen vehicular use on big game winter ranges, pressure from hikers, maintenance issues, trash, vandalism and other uses detrimental to wildlife and wildlife-related uses. And those aren’t the only problems. As Colorado’s population has grown and physically expanded into closer proximity with many of these SWAs, public uses have increased and are reaching the point where they are not compatible with the original wildlife purpose.  These other public uses have placed increasing pressure on the property infrastructure and habitat, resulting in wildlife being pushed off the properties, habitat degradation and increased costs for CPW. Before heading to South Park, I looked at the SWAs we were planning to visit using CPW’s SWA finder to make sure fishing was allowed there. Our first stop was the Badger Basin State Wildlife Area outside of Hartsel. On June 11, I traveled with my girlfriend, Jamey Hastings, and daughter, Natalie, from Colorado Springs up U.S. Highway 24, up and over Ute Pass and Wilkerson Pass, before turning north at Hartsel, heading a few miles up Park County Road 439 to the second and final parking lot. Badger Basin SWA has 752 total acres with 22 miles of the Middle Fork of the South Platte RIver fishing access. It is absolutely beautiful country.  It’s obvious why some would try to camp here, or have a picnic, or hike the SWA. But this is an important point about Badger Basin SWA: It is a fishing-only property. It’s not meant for other forms of outdoor recreation.   When we got out of the car to put on our waders, I noted a sign indicating there was a Hartsel Easy Access River Trail. This is a neat amenity at Badger Basin and the kind of thing CPW uses angler license revenue to build on SWAs. It was a section of trail right off the parking lot that has been groomed for folks of all abilities to get close to the water, even if they had limited physical abilities, and do some fly-fishing.  Natalie noticed all the frogs talking and quickly found one to show me.   A sign indicated the fishing here was artificial lures only. I’m still a novice fly-fisherman, but we were determined to do our best. Careful to keep my distance from the bull that had decided to graze quite close to us, I tied my last stone fly on and waded out into a small eddy, hoping to cast into the still water just past a section of ripples. Success! I got a small brown trout on the line and Jamey helped net him on the river bank. We took a quick photo op before I released the brownie back into the stream to grow larger for the next angler. The following day, we headed up the road to Tomahawk State Wildlife Area just northwest of Badger Basin, for more fly-fishing on the middle fork. Tomahawk SWA offers 1,655 acres of public access for fishing (artificial lures only) as well as hunting for deer, elk, pronghorn and waterfowl. The mosquitoes were out in force and we quickly regretted not bringing any insect repellant. Jamey had more luck than me on this day. She took a look at the kinds of bugs that were flitting around us and tied on a black artificial fly that landed a small brown trout. (She didn’t need my help landing it.) It was fairly small, so she decided to release her trout as well. We’ve both been skunked on more than one flyfishing expedition, so we were thrilled to have each reeled in a fish.    Coming home and reviewing our trip, we really enjoyed our socially distanced mini-vacation and appreciated the fantastic outdoors opportunities available to us in Colorado. Back at work, I continued answering calls from the public from folks who’ve grown accustomed to engaging in their chosen form of outdoor recreation on state wildlife areas, often for free.  I took calls from river rafters who put in at an SWA. Hikers who use the trails on a particular SWA to connect to other public properties. OHV riders who use the trails on an SWA. All wanted to know if their trail use now requires a license.  My answer has been the same: If you’re on an SWA, you need to possess a valid hunting or fishing license.  And I’ve tried to emphasize the important point that much of the unintended use of these properties is driving wildlife off these sanctuaries – the very reason these properties were acquired or leased in the first place.  If you care about wildlife in Colorado, buying a hunting or fishing license is one of the best ways to protect it, whether or not you actually hunt or fish. Many have asked why a wildlife-watching license isn’t offered instead. CPW actually offered a wildlife-watching license in the past, but it ran afoul of the federal rules of wildlife conservation funding.  Here’s the short explanation. (And it’s not very short.) The majority of funding for wildlife conservation comes from federal grants based on each states’ sales of hunting and fishing licenses and from excise taxes on firearms and archery equipment.  Several years ago, the General Assembly voted to require all users of SWAs to purchase a state Wildlife Habitat Stamp as a way to generate conservation funding.  It failed for a couple reasons. First, only hunters or anglers complied, for the most part. Those who only hike or watch wildlife or camp didn’t bother to buy the stamp. Second, funding for SWAs actually fell because federal officials ruled the Habitat Stamp was classified as “program income” and it ended up decreasing our federal grant money by the same amount we were able to bring in.  The General Assembly eventually repealed that statute. In hopes of increasing conservation funding and reducing unintended use of SWAs, the CPW Commission on April 30 voted to require users of SWAs to purchase a fishing or hunting license for entry. CPW will receive additional property-management funding, unlike the prior Habitat Stamp requirement.  So if you’re thinking of visiting an SWA, check it out first on CPW’s SWA finder and make sure you know what kinds of activities are allowed there and what wildlife it is meant to protect.  And don’t forget to get your hunting or fishing license at cpwshop.com before you go.  ### Travis Duncan is a public information officer for Colorado Parks and Wildlife in Denver. Travis has lived in Colorado nearly 20 years and loves the outdoors. If you have a question, please email him at travis.duncan@state.co.us PHOTOS All photos are courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife Travis Duncan displays a trout he caught while fishing the Middle Fork of the South Platte River as it runs through Badger Basin State Wildlife Area in Park County.  Travis Duncan and his family also fished in Tomahawk State Wildlife Area in Park County. A new rule requires anyone accessing Colorado Parks and Wildlife's State Wildlife Areas to buy and have in their possession a hunting or fishing license. Jamey Hastings displays a trout she caught while fishing the Middle Fork of the South Platte River as it runs through Tomahawk State Wildlife Area in Park County.    Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 7/2/2020 11:00 AM

The Spawn Must Go On
7/1/2020 5:24:41 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Jason Clay Northeast Region Public Information Officer 303-291-7234 / jason.clay@state.co.us   @CPW_NE THE SPAWN MUST GO ON Courtesy of Jerry Neal/CPW LARIMER COUNTY, Colo. - On June 30, Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials were met with a blizzard and 34-degree temperatures at Zimmerman Lake while conducting its greenback cutthroat trout spawning operation. This video from Senior Video Producer Jerry Neal highlights the dedication of CPW's aquatics staff working in these winter-like conditions, even if it says summer on the calendar. [Link to video] -  https://vimeo.com/434428021 While teamed up with CPW Cutthroat Trout Research Scientist Kevin Rogers, the Northeast Aquatics team collected spawn and mark recapture data from the greenback cutthroat trout "broodstock" population at Zimmerman Lake. Aquatic Biologists are always prepared for variable weather when working at 10,000 feet, but they certainly were not expecting blizzard conditions when they arrived at the lake early in the morning on June 30. The team captured the fish using live "trap" nets that were deployed the previous afternoon (when it was sunny and warm). Eggs were collected from females and mixed with milt (sperm) from males. The fertilized eggs were driven in small one-gallon coolers to CPW's Salida Isolation Unit, operated by the Mt. Shavano Fish Hatchery, where they are either reared to fry to be stocked back out into the wild at other reintroduction sites, or raised to one year of age to be stocked back into the wild and replenish the broodstocks at Zimmerman Lake and the Leadville National Fish Hatchery.   All of the fish that are stocked into Zimmerman Lake are given a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag, each with a unique alphanumeric code, and a color coded Visual Implant Elastomer (VIE) tag, with each color representing a different year class and family group. During the spawn operation at Zimmerman Lake, each fish was scanned for its PIT tag and visually checked for its VIE tag.  Additionally, aquatic biologists measured length and weight and identified sex of each fish. All of this information enables biologists to assess individual fish growth rates and estimate survival of the different year classes and family groups, and thus evaluate CPWs efforts to maximize genetic diversity in the broodstock.   The broodstocks at Zimmerman Lake and the Leadville National Fish Hatchery, and associated hatchery operations, represent the backbone of efforts to recover the Federally Threatened State Fish of Colorado, the Greenback Cutthroat Trout. "It is fun and rewarding work for the biologists, even though the weather isn't always ideal," said Boyd Wright, CPW Native Aquatic Species Biologist. Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 7/1/2020 3:20 PM

Big prizes beckon smallmouth bass anglers to Ridgway State Park tournament
6/30/2020 3:39:42 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Joe Lewandowski Southwest Region Public Information Officer 970-759-9590 / joe.lewandowski@state.co.us $10,000 in prize money at smallmouth bass tourney The 6th Annual Ridgway State Park Smallmouth Bass Tournament is July 11-Aug. 9. Big prizes beckon smallmouth bass anglers to Ridgway State Park tournament RIDGWAY, Colo. – If you need an extra excuse to go fishing, head over to Ridgway State Park July 11 – Aug. 9  to participate in the Sixth Annual Smallmouth Bass Fishing Tournament sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife.   CPW is reducing the population of smallmouth bass in the reservoir and needs help from anglers. To get that help, the state agency is providing major incentives to anglers: $10,000 in prize money. The more fish you catch, the more chances you’ll have for prizes.   No registration fee is required and all anglers over 16 years old must have a fishing license.   “Anglers have really helped us during the past five years and for the 6th annual tournament we’re again offering cash incentives for anglers,” said Eric Gardunio, aquatic biologist for CPW in Montrose.   A raffle category and a skills category for prizes will be offered. To qualify for any of the prizes, anglers must turn in a smallmouth bass head or the whole fish at the drop box located at the fish-cleaning station near the boat ramp. Every time an angler turns in fish he or she must fill out the registration card, sign it and place it with the fish in the plastic bags provided. Anglers can only turn in fish they’ve caught; anglers are not allowed to pool their catch.   All anglers who enter the tournament are eligible for the raffle and will receive one entry for every fish they catch. The raffle grand prize winner will receive $1,000, and ten second-tier prizes of $100 will also be awarded. All kids 12 and under who turn in a smallmouth bass will receive a package of fishing lures.   “Anyone who catches even one fish has a chance to win a big prize,” Gardunio said.   Anglers who catch a lot of fish could be rewarded generously: $5,000 for catching the most smallmouth bass; $2,000 for the second place finisher; $1,000 for third place. Each of the top three finishers will also receive a Colorado State Parks Pass good for all 41 parks. The winners in this category are not eligible for the raffle.   All fish must be in the drop box by 6 p.m., Aug. 9. Winners will be notified by Aug. 14 and prizes will be mailed.   The purpose of the annual tournament is to protect native fish and water users downstream of the reservoir. Smallmouth bass, introduced illegally to Ridgway Reservoir more than a decade ago, are predator fish that can survive in Western Slope rivers, including the Uncompahgre River which flows from the reservoir. There is a significant risk of smallmouth bass escaping from the reservoir into the river where they could reproduce and consume native fish species that are found nowhere else in the world. Smallmouth bass have escaped other impoundments in western Colorado and are adversely affecting populations of native fish in several rivers.   “By participating in the tournament and removing smallmouth bass, anglers will be actively helping with wildlife management in Colorado,” Gardunio said. “Anglers have been very effective at removing these fish in prior tournaments and we appreciate their assistance. There are no bag or possession limits on smallmouth bass at Ridgway.”   If you’ve never fished for smallmouth bass, or if you want to improve your chances of catching them, CPW has posted a web page that explains the best ways to catch smallmouth bass. The web page also includes tournament rules and an in-depth explanation of issues related to smallmouth bass at Ridgway Reservoir: https://cpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/Pages/Tournament.aspx .   Ridgway State Park, located about 20 miles south of Montrose in southwest Colorado is one of the state’s most beautiful parks. Camping, playgrounds, hiking trails, picnic areas, a swim beach, boating and river fishing are available. Entry to the park is $9 per vehicle; rates for camping range from $24-$36. An $80 annual pass provides entrance to all 41 Colorado State Parks.   Boaters are reminded that their craft must be cleaned, drained and dry before entering the reservoir at Ridgway State Park. All boats are subject to inspection for aquatic nuisance species.   For more information about the park and to make camping reservations, go to: http://cpw.state.co.us/placestogo/parks/Ridgway/Pages/default.aspx. Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 6/30/2020 1:37 PM

Fishing is Fun grants awarded for 8 Colorado angling projects
6/30/2020 2:44:42 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Travis Duncan Statewide Public Information Officer 720-595-8294 / travis.duncan @state.co.us Fishing is Fun grants awarded for 8 Colorado angling projects In-stream habitat improvements for brown trout on this section of the Conejos River in the San Luis Valley will occur thanks to this year’s Fishing is Fun grants. This is one of eight projects providing funds to improve angling opportunities in Colorado. DENVER - Colorado Parks and Wildlife has awarded $650,000 to eight Fishing is Fun (FIF) projects, all geared to improve angling opportunities in the state of Colorado. The approved projects include improved angling access, habitat improvement, and trail and boat access. Funding recipients include projects in the San Luis Valley, on the Yampa and Crystal rivers, and in the northern Front Range in Denver and Mead.   “The angling opportunities that Colorado waters provide are part of what makes this state so special,” said Dan Prenzlow, Director of Colorado Parks and Wildlife. “Not only does the Fishing is Fun program help revitalize aquatic ecosystems across the state, it also ensures that residents and visitors will continue to have improved angling access for years to come.” Among the projects approved for funding are: Wolf Lake in El Paso County Angling access will be significantly improved with the construction of two fishing piers on a newly constructed reservoir in a rapidly growing area on the northeastern side of Colorado Springs. The project will increase angling access on a 12-acre reservoir in a part of El Paso County that currently has limited angling options. “It is great to have a project like this that local kids can use to get introduced to the sport and that experienced anglers can use to stay engaged,” said Jim Guthrie, CPW's Fishing Is Fun Program Coordinator. Conejos Meadows in the San Luis Valley In-stream habitat improvements will occur on 1.75 miles of the Conejos River downstream from Platoro Reservoir in the San Luis Valley. The project will address low-flow conditions during droughts and winter reservoir operations and will protect conditions for the existing self-sustaining brown trout population. “The Conejos Meadows Resilient Habitat project is a model for projects that benefit fish habitat and wild self-maintaining trout populations, while also providing benefits to irrigation water users below a working reservoir,” said Kevin Terry, Rio Grande Basin Project Manager for Trout Unlimited. “Partnerships on the Conejos River between Trout Unlimited, CPW, and the Conejos Water Conservancy District ensure that each project identifies and maximizes benefits for the entire water community and the environment at the same time.” Uncompaghre River in Montrose This grant will restore quality angling conditions along a 0.65-mile section of the Uncompaghre River in the heart of Montrose. The multi-year project will cover 1.6 miles of river and develop in-channel habitat, stabilize river banks and connect to a major new GOCO-funded trail system. "This project delivers on the Montrose community’s desire to see stewardship of the city’s natural resources, which was identified as a top priority during the city’s comprehensive planning process,” said City of Montrose Grant Coordinator Kendall Cramer. “The restoration of our river enhances aquatic and wildlife habitat, provides new opportunities for anglers and other recreationists, and will serve as a catalyst for economic growth, particularly in the outdoor industry sector in Montrose." Fishing alone contributes $2.4 billion dollars in economic output per year, supporting over 17,000 jobs in Colorado according to CPW’s 2017 economic study. For over 30 years, FIF has supported more than 375 projects in nearly every county in the state, improving stream and river habitats, easing public access to angling waters, developing new angling opportunities for youth and seniors and more. The program typically provides up to $400,000 annually from the Federal Sport Fish Restoration Program (SFR). This year the program awarded an additional $250,000 from revenue generated through the wildlife sporting license plate. “Sportsmen and women who have signed up for the license plate have helped make more projects possible. That is a big boost to making angling accessible to many more people,” said Guthrie. The $650,000 total was met with more than $2 million in local support for the eight projects approved in 2020 (matching funds are required for the program). Additional Fishing is Fun program details and requirements can be found on CPW's website . Fishing is Fun 2020 grants include: Denver Parks and Recreation Lily Pond bank stabilization and habitat improvement $40,000 Yampa Valley Stream Improvement Charitable Trust Planning for 0.8 mile of in-stream habitat improvement at Pleasant Valley $30,000 San Luis Valley Trout Unlimited 1.75 miles of in-stream habitat and low-flow improvement at Conejos Meadows $110,600 City of Montrose In-channel habitat improvement and realignment on Uncompaghre River $284,588 Nor’wood Development Group, El Paso County Fishing piers and angler platform at Wolf Lake $38,075 Town of Mead Fishing pier and boat ramp at Highland Lake $89,625 Town of Carbondale In-stream habitat and angler access at Crystal River Riverfront Park $30,000 Town of Parachute 2 vault toilets near boat ramps on Colorado River $27,112   ### Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 6/30/2020 12:45 PM

Shuttle service from Boulder into Eldorado Canyon State Park being offered this summer
6/30/2020 10:44:41 AM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Jason Clay Northeast Region Public Information Officer 303-291-7234 / jason.clay@state.co.us   @CPW_NE Shuttle service from Boulder into Eldorado Canyon State Park being offered this summer   For additional information on the Eldo Shuttle, visit www.EldoShuttle.com. ELDORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - In a cooperative effort between Boulder County and Eldorado Canyon State Park, a new weekend and holiday shuttle service to the park will be offered from Friday, July 3 through Labor Day. Parking is extremely limited inside the state park, and no parking is available outside of it. When parking inside the state park is full, no additional vehicles are allowed in. The new shuttle service offers visitors another transportation method to the popular Boulder County destination that often is at capacity from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. during the summer on weekends and holidays. There will be five stops and three parking lots in Boulder along the shuttle route, all offer free parking, however none allow overnight parking. CU Boulder/Regent parking lot: Lot 306 on Regent Drive, just east of Broadway. Shuttle stops in the parking lot. Broadway and 27th Way: RTD Park-n-Ride on the east side of Broadway.  Catch the shuttle on the opposite side of Broadway at the southbound RTD bus stop. Note: if your car is registered outside of the RTD District, you will need to pay for parking at this lot. Broadway and Dartmouth: RTD Park-n-Ride on the east side of Broadway. Catch the shuttle on the opposite side of Broadway at the southbound RTD bus stop. Eldorado Canyon State Park entrance station Shuttle stops in front of the entrance station bathrooms Exit here to access the Streamside Trail Eldorado Canyon State Park Visitor Center Shuttle stops in front of the visitor center Exit here for the Fowler, Rattlesnake, or Eldorado Canyon Trails and the picnic area Shuttles will run on Saturdays, Sundays and on holidays from 8 a.m. to 7  p.m., departing every 15 minutes. The first shuttle leaves CU Boulder at 8 a.m. and the last shuttle leaves the state park at 7 p.m. Personal belongings or equipment that will be allowed on the shuttle include: 2 bikes per shuttle (up to 29 inches in diameter, 3.2 feet wide). Crash pads and climbing gear Leashed, well-behaved dogs Strollers A valid annual park pass or individual daily pass is required for all passengers 16 and older to ride the shuttle into Eldorado Canyon State Park (there is no state park entrance fee for kids ages 15 and younger). A valid individual annual pass is included as part of your annual vehicle pass purchase. Individual daily pass fees are $4 per person and must be purchased online prior to boarding. Annual park passes can be purchased at cpwshop.com. As a special promotion for the first two weekends of the shuttle service, Boulder County is covering the Eldorado Canyon State Park entry fee for shuttle passengers who do not have an annual pass. National Park Passes (America the Beautiful) are not valid for entry into Colorado State Parks. To reduce the spread of COVID-19, these policies have been implemented for 2020: If you have recently experienced any symptoms of COVID-19, including fever, cough or sore throat, please do not ride the shuttle or visit the state park. All passengers ages 12 and older are required to wear a mask or face covering. Please bring your own mask. To promote social distancing, shuttle capacity is limited to approximately 10 passengers or three households, whichever is less. On the shuttle, please sit in the sections labeled and leave at least one row of seats between groups. Shuttles are disinfected once per day, and high touch surfaces will be wiped down after each trip.   For additional information on the service, visit www.eldoshuttle.com   ### Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2020 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 6/30/2020 8:39 AM

 Google News about Wildlife

The following news articles are provided by the Google News service and do not reflect the views or imply an endorsement by the Colorado Land Conservation Assistance Network and its affiliates. We cannot guarantee the relevance of the content of this page or any links that may be followed from the articles herein.

Sage Grouse Habitat Management News Items
The Colorado valley at stake in Trump's oil boom - High Country News
7/19/2018 3:00:00 AM
The Colorado valley at stake in Trump's oil boom    High Country News

Wildlife Conservation Strategy News Items
Sweetwater Lake closer to conservation as Forest Service land - The Colorado Sun
7/1/2020 2:00:00 AM
Sweetwater Lake closer to conservation as Forest Service land    The Colorado Sun

Joe Neguse wants to direct billions to public lands to help Western states recover from coronavirus - The Colorado Sun
6/18/2020 3:00:00 AM
Joe Neguse wants to direct billions to public lands to help Western states recover from coronavirus    The Colorado Sun

GOCO's transition to new grant distribution strategy creates avenue for Colorado coronavirus relief - The Colorado Sun
6/5/2020 3:00:00 AM
GOCO's transition to new grant distribution strategy creates avenue for Colorado coronavirus relief    The Colorado Sun

Colorado wildlife agency’s past research raises questions about mountain lion hunting levels - The Denver Post
5/24/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado wildlife agency’s past research raises questions about mountain lion hunting levels    The Denver Post

Native Plants Help Restore the Colorado River - Audubon Magazine
5/1/2020 3:00:00 AM
Native Plants Help Restore the Colorado River    Audubon Magazine

Colorado oil and gas regulators punt major rule changes until after their paid replacements are hired - The Colorado Sun
4/30/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado oil and gas regulators punt major rule changes until after their paid replacements are hired    The Colorado Sun

Colorado throws wolves to the vote - The Colorado Independent
3/4/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado throws wolves to the vote    The Colorado Independent

Wolf reintroduction vote, program becoming emotional issue for some Colorado residents - Aspen Times
2/26/2020 3:00:00 AM
Wolf reintroduction vote, program becoming emotional issue for some Colorado residents    Aspen Times

Colorado voters favor public land protection - Estes Park Trail-Gazette
2/26/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado voters favor public land protection    Estes Park Trail-Gazette

9 lesser-known public gardens in Colorado that are worth a visit - The Know
2/23/2020 3:00:00 AM
9 lesser-known public gardens in Colorado that are worth a visit    The Know

Colorado College poll: Western voters find common ground on environment as priority - Colorado Springs Gazette
2/22/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado College poll: Western voters find common ground on environment as priority    Colorado Springs Gazette

Colorado Parks and Wildlife enters next phase of ‘Live Life Outside’ campaign with ‘Conservation Starts Small’ - Journal Advocate
2/20/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Parks and Wildlife enters next phase of ‘Live Life Outside’ campaign with ‘Conservation Starts Small’    Journal Advocate

Voters in Colorado and the West prioritize environment and increasingly demand climate action, poll finds - The Denver Post
2/20/2020 3:00:00 AM
Voters in Colorado and the West prioritize environment and increasingly demand climate action, poll finds    The Denver Post

SCI Raises $140,000 to Help Defeat Colorado Wolf Ballot Initiative - AmmoLand Shooting Sports News
2/12/2020 3:00:00 AM
SCI Raises $140,000 to Help Defeat Colorado Wolf Ballot Initiative    AmmoLand Shooting Sports News

Colorado wildlife officials seek solution as elk herds decline - The Durango Herald
2/9/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado wildlife officials seek solution as elk herds decline    The Durango Herald

Colorado launches elk study to determine human recreation effects on herd health - goHUNT.com
1/30/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado launches elk study to determine human recreation effects on herd health    goHUNT.com

Wolves confirmed in Colorado - goHUNT.com
1/28/2020 3:00:00 AM
Wolves confirmed in Colorado    goHUNT.com

Survey shows overwhelming support for reintroducing wolves in Colorado - The Colorado Sun
1/24/2020 3:00:00 AM
Survey shows overwhelming support for reintroducing wolves in Colorado    The Colorado Sun

Survey shows wide support for reintroducing wolves in Colorado - The Journal
1/24/2020 3:00:00 AM
Survey shows wide support for reintroducing wolves in Colorado    The Journal

18 Organizations Protecting Biodiversity in Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico - Food Tank
1/22/2020 3:00:00 AM
18 Organizations Protecting Biodiversity in Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico    Food Tank

Colorado Braces for Wolves as Politics Clash with Wildlife Management - Outdoor Life
1/13/2020 1:19:04 PM
Colorado Braces for Wolves as Politics Clash with Wildlife Management    Outdoor Life

What you need to know about the effort to bring wolves back to Colorado - The Colorado Independent
1/6/2020 3:00:00 AM
What you need to know about the effort to bring wolves back to Colorado    The Colorado Independent

Coyotes figured out how to survive in the city. Can urban Coloradans learn to coexist? - The Colorado Sun
1/6/2020 3:00:00 AM
Coyotes figured out how to survive in the city. Can urban Coloradans learn to coexist?    The Colorado Sun

Former Colorado wildlife commissioner says reintroducing wolves is a bad idea - goHUNT.com
1/6/2020 3:00:00 AM
Former Colorado wildlife commissioner says reintroducing wolves is a bad idea    goHUNT.com

Southwest Colorado chosen for $50 million forest project - The Journal
12/16/2019 3:00:00 AM
Southwest Colorado chosen for $50 million forest project    The Journal

Colorado wolf ballot may have enough support - goHUNT.com
12/12/2019 3:00:00 AM
Colorado wolf ballot may have enough support    goHUNT.com

Beh named executive director of Central Colorado Conservancy - by Jan Wondra - The Ark Valley Voice
11/22/2019 3:00:00 AM
Beh named executive director of Central Colorado Conservancy - by Jan Wondra    The Ark Valley Voice

CPW releases 14 endangered black-footed ferrets on Walker Ranch in Pueblo West - KOAA.com Colorado Springs and Pueblo News
11/20/2019 3:00:00 AM
CPW releases 14 endangered black-footed ferrets on Walker Ranch in Pueblo West    KOAA.com Colorado Springs and Pueblo News

Federal Plan Endangers Recovery for Dwindling Gunnison Sage Grouse in Colorado, Utah - Center for Biological Diversity
10/31/2019 3:00:00 AM
Federal Plan Endangers Recovery for Dwindling Gunnison Sage Grouse in Colorado, Utah    Center for Biological Diversity

Trump's "energy dominance" push changing plans for 3 million acres of Colorado land, local stewards say - The Colorado Sun
9/27/2019 3:00:00 AM
Trump's "energy dominance" push changing plans for 3 million acres of Colorado land, local stewards say    The Colorado Sun

Privately owned Fisher’s Peak in southern Colorado to become 42nd state park - The Denver Post
9/12/2019 3:00:00 AM
Privately owned Fisher’s Peak in southern Colorado to become 42nd state park    The Denver Post

NYT best-selling author throws BIG money at Colorado wolf ballot proposal - goHUNT.com
9/3/2019 3:00:00 AM
NYT best-selling author throws BIG money at Colorado wolf ballot proposal    goHUNT.com

Are Trails in Colorado Harming Wildlife? - 5280 | The Denver Magazine
8/15/2019 3:00:00 AM
Are Trails in Colorado Harming Wildlife?    5280 | The Denver Magazine

Requests sought for Colorado Wildlife Habitat Program with $11 million in grants available - Summit Daily News
5/5/2019 3:00:00 AM
Requests sought for Colorado Wildlife Habitat Program with $11 million in grants available    Summit Daily News

Colorado Parks has a whole bunch of money to give landowners who want to help wildlife - The Denver Post
5/2/2019 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Parks has a whole bunch of money to give landowners who want to help wildlife    The Denver Post

Colorado Parks program offers $11 million in grants to private landowners to protect wildlife - Aspen Times
5/2/2019 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Parks program offers $11 million in grants to private landowners to protect wildlife    Aspen Times

Colorado wildlife officials are reluctant to OK gray wolf reintroduction. So advocates want voters to do it. - The Colorado Sun
4/25/2019 3:00:00 AM
Colorado wildlife officials are reluctant to OK gray wolf reintroduction. So advocates want voters to do it.    The Colorado Sun