Wildlife in Central Mountains Region

 Sage Grouse Habitat Management

   
Show Articles on Sage Grouse Habitat Management (57)
Up In Smoke: Fire and Invasives on Western Rangelands
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Sagebrush rangelands once covered nearly 250 million acres in western North America. Today, this landscape has been reduced to half its original size and is rapidly shrinking.

 

Using Existing Tools to Expand Cooperative Conservation for Candidate Species Across Federal and Non-Federal Lands
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For many years the Service has worked with partners to help them develop Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCAs). CCAs primarily have been developed by Federal agencies to cover Federal lands, and several have resulted in conservation efforts that made listing unnecessary.

 

Reducing Conflict with Grizzly Bears, Wolves and Elk A Western Landowners’ Guide
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This guide has been produced by and for landowners and practitioners constructively engaged in one of the greatest conservation challenges of our time—how to share and manage a wild, working landscape that sustains both people and wildlife.

 

Cooperative Conservation - Determinants of Landowner Engagement in Conserving Endangered Species
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This paper analyzes surveys of private landowners to identify factors that determine landowner engagement in the conservation of endangered species.

 

Western Governors’ Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative
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The Western Governors’ Species Conservation and Endangered Species Act Initiative was launched by WGA Chairman and Wyoming Gov.

 

Greater Sage Grouse - Colorado Synthesis Report
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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is poised to propose a listing decision for the Greater Sage Grouse under the Endangered Species Act by 2015.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Appendices
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Appendices for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Conservation Strategy
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Conservation strategy for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Analysis
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Analysis for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Issues
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Issues section of the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Conservation Assessment
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Conservation assessment for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Executive Summary
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Executive summary for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Table of Contents
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Table of Contents for the Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan (CCP). The purpose of the CCP is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Plan - Introduction
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The purpose of the Colorado Greater Sage-grouse Conservation Plan (CCP) is to facilitate the conservation of greater sage-grouse (GrSG) and their habitats in Colorado.

 

Greater Sage-Grouse Range-Wide Mitigation Framework
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The purpose of this document is to help states, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and other partners develop and implement coordinated and robust mitigation processes across the range to reduce threats and the potential need to list the species under the Endangered Species Act.

 

Gunnison Sage Grouse Rangewide Conservation Plan
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This Rangewide Conservation Plan is intended to supplement local plans, and to offer a rangewide perspective, so as to ensure that the cumulative result of conserving local populations is conservation of the species.

 

Safe Harbor - Helping Landowners Help Endangered Species
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This handbook describes safe harbor agreements and the way in which they work. It aims to help you decide if a safe harbor agreement makes sense for your land.& ...

 

Adverse Impact Reduction Handbook
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Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach

 

Weed Management for Small Rural Acreages
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A CSU Extension Fact Sheet with information on prevention, eradication, and control of common weeds found in Colorado.

 

Sage Grouse Initiative Web Map Application

The SGI Interactive Web Map Application is free and available to the public, presenting cutting-edge geospatial data covering 100 million acres. The Sage Grouse Initiative science team has developed an easy-to-use web application that helps visualize, distribute, and interact with information about the sagebrush-steppe ecosystem.

All of the information can be easily visualized on top of physical maps or the latest satellite imagery. Users can quickly identify and compare areas of concern, evaluating potential restoration or prevention opportunities. Data can be imported from the web application directly into GIS software, which allows the public to customize the information for land management or conservation purposes. Data for individual counties can be downloaded using these simple instructions.

 

Northwest Colorado Greater Sage-Grouse Approved Resource Management Plan Amendment
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This Approved Resource Management Plan Amendment (ARMPA) is the result of the March 2010 US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) 12-Month Finding for Petitions to List the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as Threatened or Endangered (75 Federal  Register 13910, March 23, 2010;USFWS 2010).

 

Pocket Guide to Sagebrush Birds
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This Guide was created by staffs at Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory and at PRBO Conservation Science, describes 40 of the most common bird species in sagebrush habitats.& ...

 

Pocket Guide to Sagebrush
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This Guide provides identifying characteristics and range maps for 18 species of sagebrush, encompassing 27 different kinds (including subspecies and hybrids).

 

Greater Sage-grouse Comprehensive Conservation Strategy
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This Strategy outlines the critical need to develop the associations among local, state, provincial, tribal, and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individual citizens to design and implement cooperative actions to support robust populations of sage-grouse and the landscapes and habitats upon which they depend.

 

Summary of Science, Activities, Programs, and Policies That Influence the Rangewide Conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)
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Sage Grouse Initiative - Success on the Range
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The Sage Grouse Initiative launched in 2010 and five years later is a primary catalyst for sage-steppe conservation, conserving 4.4 million acres across 11 western states.

 

Science to Solutions - Private Lands Vital to Conserving Wet Areas for Sage Grouse Summer Habitat
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A recent groundbreaking study reveals a strong link between sites, which are essential summer habitat for sage grouse to raise their broods, and the distribution of sage grouse breeding areas or leks.

 

BLM Fire and Aviation - Sage Grouse Efforts
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Fire is an important part of the ecology of sagebrush habitats. It’s not possible to eliminate all fire from sagebrush, nor is it advisable.

 

Trial by Fire - Improving Our Ability to Reduce Wildfire Impacts to Sage-Grouse and Sagebrush Ecosystems Through Accelerated Partner Collaboration
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Wildfire and subsequent invasion by exotic annual grasses in the Great Basin challenge land managers and impede the success of conservation practices designed to improve habitat quality for sage-grouse.

 

Birds in a sagebrush sea - managing sagebrush habitats for bird communities
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The purpose of this document is to help anyone who is a steward of sagebrush shrublands include management practices that help support a thriving community of wild birds.

 

Science to Solutions - Conifer Removal Restores Sage Grouse Habitat
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The invasion of juniper and other conifers into sagebrush rangelands degrades habitat for sage grouse. The most effective approach is to target early encroachment stands, completely removing small trees, and thereby sustaining the existing sagebrush community.

 

Livestock Water Tanks and Sage-grouse - A Landowners Guide
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Watering tanks installed for livestock are often used by wildlife as well, with unintended consequences. Sage-grouse are known to drown in livestock water tanks that do not have escape ramps.

 

Science to Solutions - Marking High-Risk Fences Saves Sage Grouse
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Marking fences for visibility can dramatically reduce sage grouse collisions. A new mapping tool can help managers and landowners target those fences that pose the highest risk for grouse strikes: fences close to leks and in flat or rolling terrain.

 

Who’s on the Lek A Guide to Players
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Document describes some of the key entities in the conservation of sage-grouse and sagebrush ecosystems.

 

Interagency Sage-grouse Conservation Implementation MOU
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MOU provides for cooperation among the participating State and federal land, wildlife management and science agencies in the conservation and management of Greater sage-grouse, sagebrush habitats and other sagebrush-dependent wildlife throughout the Western United States and Canada.

 

Overview of Greater Sage-grouse and Endangered Species Act Activities
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The Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a game bird managed under State authorities. Summarizes petitions to USFWS to list the species under ESA, the Services conclusions and litigation status.

 

Sage-grouse Mapping and Priority Habitats
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This primer displays the historic and current range of sage-grouse, sage-grouse management zones, and the breeding bird density map.

 

Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Findings for Petitions to List the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as Threatened or Endangered
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Fish and Wildlife Service’s March 2010 status review provides a detailed description of seasonal habitats, sage-grouse natural history and population trend analyses.

 

Beginner’s Guide to Greater Sage-Grouse
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Introductory guide provides key points for a basic understanding of the greater sage-grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus and  its habitats.

 

Near Term Sage-Grouse Conservation Action Plan
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Plan presented to Greater Sage-grouse Executive Oversight Committee & Sage-Grouse Task Force, September 11, 2012.

 

Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) Conservation Objectives - Final Report
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February 2013 report delineates reasonable objectives, based upon the best scientific and commercial data available at the time of its release, for the conservation and survival of greater sage-grouse.

 

Conserving Wildlife and Crucial Habitat in the West
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Policy Resolution 13-04: Western Governors direct the Western Governors’ Wildlife Council to continue its guidance in the development, management and implementation with partners of the state and West-wide CHATs.

 

Sage-Grouse Initiative - Conservation Beyond Boundaries
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2012 Progress Report describes the need, goals, and results/outcomes of the Initiative.

 

Two Win-Win Initiatives with Common Recovery Goals Lesser Prairie-Chicken and Greater Sage-Grouse
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Lesser prairie-chickens and greater sage-grouse depend on large prairie and steppe landscapes shared by agricultural producers, primarily ranching operations.

 

Sage Grouse Initiative - Tracking Success
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The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) launched the Sage Grouse Initiative in 2010, applying the power of the Farm Bill to target lands where habitats are intact and sage grouse numbers are highest.

 

Applying the Sage-Grouse Fence Collision Risk Tool to Reduce Bird Strikes
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A Landowner's Guide to Wildlife Friendly Fences - How to Build Fence with Wildlife in Mind
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A Landowner's Guide to Fences and Wildlife - Practical Tips to Make Your Fences Wildlife Friendly
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Wyoming Edition  

 

Influences of Livestock Grazing on Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat - Context and Management
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Greater Sage-Grouse Field Indicator Guide
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This brochure is offered to the public to further outreach and education about sage-grouse; a species being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Program.

 

Native Plants - A Quick Reference Guide
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Learn more about native plants, get involved, and spread the word!

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Predictability FAQs
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Working Lands for Wildlife Implementation Process
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Working Lands for Wildlife Greater Sage-Grouse
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FAQs Including CCAA and SGI Comparison

 

Inventory of State and Local Governments’ Conservation Initiatives for Sage-Grouse
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The 2014 Sage-Grouse Appendix identifies all sage-grouse conservation initiatives reported by states and counties between 2011 and 2014. &n ...

 

Sage-Grouse Inventory - 2014 Conservation Initiatives
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The fourth annual inventory produced by the Governors, through the Western Governors' Association, has expanded its focus from previous years.

 

Conservation Assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and Sagebrush Habitats
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In this report, the authors assessed the ecological status and potential factors that influenced greater sage-grouse and sagebrush habitats across their entire distribution.& ...

 

Show Sage Grouse Habitat Management Organizations & Professionals (512)
There are 512 resources serving Central Mountains Region in the following categories:
map itMap of Sage Grouse Habitat Management Organizations & Professionals serving Central Mountains Region
Biologists / Ecologists
Alan Carpenter, PhD
Land Stewardship Consulting, Inc. - Boulder, CO
Basin Wildlife Consulting
Rick Danvir - Casper, WY
Bob Hix
Pheasants Forever Inc. - Regional Field Representative - Aurora, CO
Chris Pague
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Senior Conservation Ecologist - Denver, CO
Colorado Wildlife Science, LLC
Jonathan Lowsky - Principal Ecologist - Basalt, CO
Dawn Reeder
Rare Earth Sciences, LLC - Principal Biologist - Paonia, CO
Eco-Asset Solutions & Innovations LLC
William Coleman - Co-Founder & CEO - Redwood City, CA
Gillian Bee
Bird Conservancy of the Rockies - Stewardship Director - Fort Collins, CO
Greg Simons
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Wildlife Biologist - San Angelo, TX
James Armstrong
Rare Earth Science, LLC - Principal Geologist / Environmental Scientist - Gunnison, CO
Kelly Colfer
Western Bionomics, Inc. - President - Steamboat Springs, CO
Kit H. Buell
Buell Environmental LLC - Ecologist - Oak Creek, CO
Kristina Kline
Private Lands Wildlife Biologist - Durango, CO
Lisa Tasker
EM Ecological, LLC - Principal Ecologist - Aspen, CO
Marcella Tarantino
SGI Strategic Watershed Action Team - Farm Bill Biologist - Montrose, CO
Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc.
James Schriever - Vice President Geospatial Services - Woodland Park, CO
Matt Tobler
Blue Mountain Environmental Consulting, LLC - Natural Resource Specialist/Director - Fort Collins, CO
Patty Knupp
Area Biologist - USDA-NRCS Area Three Office - Pueblo, CO
Rebecca Burton
SGI Strategic Watershed Action Team - Farm Bill Biologist - Craig, CO
Riverbend Engineering, LLC.
Chris Philips, MS, PE, CFM - Owner and Senior Scientist - Albuquerque, NM
Roe Ecological Services, LLC
Chris and Kelly Roe - Logan, KS
Ruben Cantu
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Certified Wildlife Biologist, Certified Professional Rangeland Management - San Angelo, TX
Seth Gallagher
Sage Grouse Initiative - Field Capacity and Delivery Coordinator - Fort Collins, CO
Southwest Monarch Study
Stephen R. Wenger
- Glade Park, CO
Steve Boyle
BIO-Logic, Inc. - Principal & Senior Biologist - Montrose, CO
Tammy VerCauteren
Executive Director, Administration - Prairie Partners Program - Fort Collins, CO
Terri Schulz
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director of Landscape Science and Management - Denver, CO
West Elks Ecological Consulting
Dawn Barton - Owner, Founder of West Elks, and Principal Biologist - Carbondale, CO
Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Lesser Prairie-Chicken
Sean Kyle - Lesser Prairie Chicken Program Manager - Topeka, KS
Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program
Steve Jose - Chief - Lakewood, CO
Conservation Districts
Bookcliff Conservation District
- Glenwood Springs, CO
Colorado Association of Conservation Districts
- Lamar, CO
Eagle County Conservation District
- Eagle, CO
Fremont Conservation District
- Canon City, CO
Gunnison Conservation District
- Gunnison, CO
Jefferson Conservation District
- Lakewood, CO
Lake County Conservation District
- Leadville, CO
Middle Park Conservation District
- KREMMLING, CO
Mount Sopris Conservation District
- Glenwood Springs, CO
Shavano Conservation District
- Montrose, CO
South Side Conservation District
- Glenwood Springs, CO
Teller-Park Conservation District
- Woodland Park, CO
Upper Arkansas Conservation District
- Salida, CO
Conservation Groups and Associations
Access Fund
- Boulder, CO
Agrarian Trust
Ian McSweeney - Director - Weare, NH
AGree
- Washington, DC
American Agri-Women
- Colchester, VT
American Farm Bureau Federation
- Washington, DC
American Forest Foundation
- Washington, DC
American Forests
- Washington, DC
American Friends of Canadian Land Trusts
Sandra Tassel - Program Coordinator - Bellingham, WA
American Hiking Society
- Silver Spring, MD
American Tree Farm System
Paul DeLong - Senior Vice President, ATFS & Conservation - Washington, DC
Arbor Day Foundation
- Nebraska City, NE
Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies
- Washington, DC
Bat Conservation International
- Austin, TX
Bee City USA
An Initiative of the Xerces Society - Portland, OR
Bird Conservancy of the Rockies
- Brighton, CO
Butterflies and Their People
Dr. Ellen Sharp - Board Member and Project Director - Capulin, 
Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
Roberta Clowater - Executive Director - Fredericton, NB
Center for Collaborative Conservation
Warner College of Natural Resources - Colorado State University - Fort Collins, CO
Center for Large Landscape Conservation
- Bozeman, MT
Chris Pague
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Senior Conservation Ecologist - Denver, CO
Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance
- Missoula, MT
CitSci.org
Greg Newman - Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory at Colorado State University - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation
Brooke S. Fox - President/CEO - Castle Rock, CO
Colorado Cattlemen’s Association
Sarah Smith - Marketing & Communications Director - Arvada, CO
Colorado Mountain Club
Scott Robson - Executive Director - Golden, CO
Colorado Nonprofit Association
Renny Fagan - President and CEO - Denver, CO
Colorado Pheasants Forever
Bob Hix - Regional Representative for Colorado & Wyoming - Aurora, CO
Colorado State Land Board
- Denver, CO
Colorado Watershed Assembly
Casey Davenhill - Executive Director - Denver, CO
Community for Sustainable Energy
Fred Kirsch - Director - Fort Collins, CO
Conservation Colorado
Beka WilsonCO
Conservation Law Center
Christian Freitag - Director - Bloomington, IN
Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC)
- West Lafayette, IN
Continental Dialogue on Non-Native Forests Insects and Diseases
- Sheffield, MA
Ecological Restoration Business Association
- Tysons, VA
EcoResults!
- Flagstaff, AZ
Environment Colorado
Kim Stevens - State Director - Denver, CO
Equine Land Conservation Resource
- Lexington, KY
Family Farm Alliance
Dan Keppen - Executive Director - Klamath Falls, OR
Farmers For Monarchs
Franklin Holley - Keystone, CO
Forest Stewards Guild
- Santa Fe, NM
Forest Stewardship Council
- Minneapolis, MN
George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center (Sutton Center)
- Bartlesville, OK
Great Ecology
- San Diego, CA
Great Outdoors Colorado
- Denver, CO
Great Plains Institute for Sustainable Development
Gail Nosek - Communications Director - Minneapolis, MN
Green School Alliance
- New York, NY
High Plains Environmental Center
- Loveland, CO
Institute for Environmental Solutions
- Denver, CO
Intermountain West Joint Venture
- Missoula, MT
Itasca Ladyslipper Farm
Carol Steele - Grand Rapids, MN
John Sanderson
Center for Collaborative Conservation - Director - Fort Collins, CO
Journey North
- Madison, WI
Keep It Colorado (formerly Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts)
Melissa Daruna - Exeuctive Director - Golden, CO
Land Conservation and Advocacy Trust
Steve Meltzer - Founder and Executive Director - Framingham, MA
Land Trust Alliance
- Washington, DC
Mad Agriculture
- Boulder, CO
Metro Blooms
Becky Rice - Executive Director - Minneapolis, MN
Monarch Butterfly and Pollinators Conservation Fund
- Washington, DC
Monarch Collaborative
Keystone Policy Center - Keystone, CO
Monarch Joint Venture
- St. Paul, MN
Monarch Larva Monitoring Project
- Madison, WI
Mule Deer Foundation
- Salt Lake City, UT
MultiState Conservation Grant Program
- Washington, DC
National Association of State Foresters
- Washington, DC
National Audubon Society
- New York, NY
National Deer Association
- Bogart, GA
National Family Farm Coaltion
- Washington, DC
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
- Washington, DC
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation - Rocky Mountain Regional Office
Chris West - Director - Denver, CO
National Forestry Association
Keith A. Argow - President, Director at Large - Vienna, VA
National Grazing Lands Coalition
Monti Golla - National GLC Executive Director - College Station, TX
National Trust for Historic Preservation
- Washington, DC
National Wild Turkey Federation
- Edgefield, SC
National Wild Turkey Federation - Colorado State Chapter
Crystal Adams - Regional DirectorCO
National Wildlife Federation
- Reston, VA
No-till on the Plains
- Berryton, KS
Paige Lewis
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director, Forest Health and Fire Initiative in Colorado - Denver, CO
Parks for Pollinators
National Recreation and Park Association - Ashburn, VA
Partners for Western Conservation
- Arvada, CO
Partners in the Sage
- Missoula, MT
Partnerscapes
Steve Jester - Executive Director - Pueblo, CO
Partnership of Rangeland Trusts
- Arvada, CO
Pheasants Forever
- St Paul, MN
Pinchot Institute for Conservation
V. Alaric Sample - President - Washington, DC
Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV)
- Erie, CO
Pollinator Partnership
- San Francisco, CA
Pollinators Prospering People
Project Monarch Health
- Athens, GA
Quail and Upland Wildlife Federation, Inc.
Craig A. Alderman - Executive Director - Buffalo, MO
Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
- Washington, DC
RiversEdge West
- Grand Junction, CO
Roaring Fork Outdoor Volunteers
J. David Hamilton - Executive Director - Basalt, CO
Robert R Bryan
Forest Synthesis - President/Habitat Conservation Forester - Harpswell, ME
Sage Grouse Initiative
Tim Griffiths - Coordinator - Bozeman, MT
Sage Grouse Initiative Strategic Watershed Action Team
Dave Smith - Intermountain West Joint Venture (IWJV) Coordinator - Missoula, MT
Savory Institute
- Boulder, CO
Soil and Water Conservation Society
- Ankeny, IA
Southwest Monarch Study
Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development
Judith KohlerCO
Stay The Trail Colorado
Dan Gourley - Program CoordinatorCO
Susan Lohr
Lohr Associates - Grand Junction, CO
Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Kathy Abusow - President and CEO - Washington, DC
Sustainable Forests Roundtable
Sustainable Monarchs
- North Platte, NE
Tammy VerCauteren
Executive Director, Administration - Prairie Partners Program - Fort Collins, CO
Tax Credit Connection, Inc.
Ariel Steele, Owner - Berthoud, CO
Terrafirma RRG LLC
- Burlington, VT
Terri Schulz
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director of Landscape Science and Management - Denver, CO
Texan by Nature
- Austin, TX
The Climate Trust
- Portland, OR
The Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation
Lindsay Thomas - Chairman - Washington, DC
The Conservation Fund
- Arlington, VA
The Fund for Wild Nature
- La Canada, CA
The Land Institute
- Salina, KS
The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
- Portland, OR
Thunder Bay Field Naturalists
Bruce Thacker - President - Thunder Bay, ON
Trout Headwaters, Inc.
- Livingston, MT
Turtle Islands Earth Stewards
Tyhson Banighen - Tappen, BC
U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance (USFRA)
- Chesterfield, MO
Upper Thames River Conservation Authority
- London, ON
USA National Phenology Network
- Tucson, AZ
Valleys 2000
Bill Huether - Treasurer - Bowmanville, ON
Ward Burton Wildlife Foundation
- Halifax, VA
Western Aquatic Plant Management Society
- Portland, OR
Western Landowners Alliance
Lesli Allison - Executive Director - Santa Fe, NM
Western Monarch Milkweed Mapper
Xerces Society
Western Native Trout Initiative
Therese Thompson - Project Coordinator - Lakewood, CO
Western Resource Advocates
Jon Goldin-Dubois - President - Boulder, CO
Western Rivers Conservancy
Sue Doroff - President - Portland, OR
Wildlands Restoration Volunteers
Ed Self - Founder and Executive Director - Boulder, CO
Wildlife Research Institute
- Julian, CA
Women, Food & Agriculture Network
- Ames, IA
Cooperative Extension
Clear Creek County Extension
- Georgetown, CO
CSU Extension
Chaffee County Extension
Anita Miller - Extension Assistant - Salida, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Nursery
- Fort Collins, CO
Eagle County Extension
Donna Boley - Administrative Technician - Eagle, CO
Fremont County Extension
Tommy L. Covington - County Director - Canon City, CO
Gilpin County Extension
Irene Shonle - Director - Black Hawk, CO
Gunnison County Extension
- Gunnison, CO
Park County Extension
- Fairplay, CO
Summit County Extension
Dan Schroder - Extension Agent/County Director - Frisco, CO
Teller County Extension
Mark Platten - County Director - Woodland Park, CO
Department of Interior - Fish and Wildlife Service Programs
Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) Task Force
Dr. Susan Pasko - Executive Secretary, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Falls Church, VA
Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances
US Fish and Wildlife Service - Ecological Services Program - Falls Church, VA
Candidate Conservation Program
US Fish and Wildlife Service - Falls Church, VA
Colorado Ecological Service Field Office - USFWS
- Denver, CO
Colorado Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office
Gregory Gerlich - FAC Assistant Regional Director - Denver, CO
Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund Grants
Region 6 - Mountain Prairie - Lakewood, CO
Fish Passage Program - Mountain-Prairie Region
Bill Rice - Fish Passage Coordinator - Denver, CO
Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Yvette Converse - GNLCC Coordinator - Bozeman, MT
Habitat Conservation Plans
US Fish and Wildlife Service - Falls Church, VA
Landowner Incentive Program
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
MultiState Conservation Grant Program
- Washington, DC
National Fish Passage Program
- Falls Church, VA
Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act Grants Program
Guy Foulks - NMBCA Program Coordinator - Falls Church, VA
North American Wetlands Conservation Act Grants Program
U.S. Department of the Interior - Arlington, VA
North American Wetlands Conservation Act Small Grants Program
Rodecia Mcknight - Small Grants Program Coordinator - Falls Church, VA
North American Wetlands Conservation Act Standard Grants Program
Stacy Sanchez - U.S. Standard Grants Program Proposal Coordinator - Falls Church, VA
Partners For Fish And Wildlife Program - National
See Description
Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program in Colorado
Dominic Barrett  - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  - Lakewood, CO
Safe Harbor Agreements
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Kevin Johnson, SRLCC Coordinator - Fish Wildlife Service - Lakewood, CO
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Coastal Program
Samantha Brooke - Coastal Program Team Lead - Falls Church, VA
Western Colorado Field Office
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Grand Junction, CO
Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program
Steve Jose - Chief - Lakewood, CO
Working Lands for Wildlife
Tim Griffiths - Bozeman, MT
Foresters
Barry Rhea
Rhea Environmental Consulting - Owner, primary consultant - Mancos, CO
Bjorn M. Dahl, ACF
Dahl Environment Services LLC - President - Golden, CO
Bruce Short
Short Forestry LLC - Certified Forester - Mancos, CO
Ceres Landcare
- Eagle, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Golden Field Office
- Golden, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Boulder Field Office
- Longmont, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Cañon City Field Office
- Cañon City, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Fort Collins
- Fort Collins, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Granby Field Office
- Granby, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Gunnison Field Office
- Gunnison, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Salida Field Office
- Salida, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Woodland Park Field Office
- Woodland Park, CO
Council of Western State Foresters
Sara Goodwin - Communications Director - Edgewater, CO
Forest Stewardship Program
- Fort Collins, CO
Grand Junction Field Office of the Colorado State Forest Service
- Grand Junction, CO
Greenleaf Forestry and Wood Products, Inc.
Len Lankford - President and CEO - Westcliffe, CO
Gretchen Cross
Buell Environmental LLC - Forester - Encampment, WY
James E. Ficke
Natural Resource Consultants - President - Steamboat Springs, CO
James Webb
Forest Stewardship Concepts, Ltd. - Certified Forester - Monte Vista, CO
Jim McGannon
Forestry/Landscape Consultant - Golden, CO
Joe Reddan, ACF
Flexilis Forestry - Principal - Durango, CO
Kit H. Buell
Buell Environmental LLC - Ecologist - Oak Creek, CO
Lawton Grinter
Rocky Mountain Forestry LLC - Certified Forester - Wheat Ridge, CO
Mark Rasmussen
Mason Bruce & Girard Inc. - Forester Planner & Economist - Portland, OR
Markit! Forestry Management
- Colorado Springs, CO
Mason, Bruce & Girard
- Portland, OR
Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc.
James Schriever - Vice President Geospatial Services - Woodland Park, CO
Matt Tobler
Blue Mountain Environmental Consulting, LLC - Natural Resource Specialist/Director - Fort Collins, CO
Northwest Management, Inc.
Vincent P. Corrao - President - Moscow, ID
TigerTree Land Management
Franz Lani - Laramie, WY
William Hutton
Conservation Partners LLP - Of Council - Oakland, CA
Land Trusts
American Farmland Trust
- Washington, DC
Aspen Valley Land Trust
Erin Quinn - Conservation Director - Carbondale, CO
Association pour la protection de l'environnement du lac Saint-Charles (APEL)
Jean-claude Valliere - Quebec, QC
Black Canyon Regional Land Trust
- Montrose, CO
Brenda Schick
Singing Stream Conservation Consultants - Principal - La Jolla, CA
Central Colorado Conservancy
- Salida, CO
Clear Creek Land Conservancy
- Golden, CO
Colorado Cattlemen's Agricultural Land Trust
Erik Glenn - Executive Director - Arvada, CO
Colorado Open Lands
Tony Caligiuri - President and CEO - Lakewood, CO
Colorado Trail Foundation
Bill Manning - Executive Director - Golden, CO
Colorado West Land Trust
Rob Bleiberg - Executive Director - Grand Junction, CO
Colorado Wildlife Heritage Foundation
Matthew Hudson - Executive Director - Denver, CO
Continental Divide Land Trust
Rachel Winkler - Program Manager - Frisco, CO
Crested Butte Land Trust
Claire Karban - Outreach Coordinator - Crested Butte, CO
Eagle Valley Land Trust
Jim Daus - Executive Director - Edwards, CO
Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy
Stacy McPhail - Executive Director - Gunnison, CO
John Sanderson
Center for Collaborative Conservation - Director - Fort Collins, CO
Keep It Colorado (formerly Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts)
Melissa Daruna - Exeuctive Director - Golden, CO
L'Ile du marais inc.
Angela Losito - Sainte-Catherine-de-Hatley, QC
La Plata Open Space Conservancy
Patrick Barker - Executive Director - Durango, CO
Lake Fork Valley Conservancy
Camille Richard - Executive Director - Lake City, CO
Land Trust Alliance
- Washington, DC
Margo Heekin
- Land Trust Consultant - Fort Bragg, CA
Mountain Area Land Trust
- Evergreen, CO
North American Land Trust
- Chadds Ford, PA
Open Space Institute
Jennifer Grossman - Vice President New York Land Program - New York, NY
Orono Crown Lands Trust
June Smith - Orono, ON
Palmer Land Trust
Stephanie Thomas - Director of Land Stewardship - Colorado Springs, CO
Peter D. Nichols
Berg Hill Greenleaf Ruscitti, LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
Roaring Fork Conservancy
Rick Lofaro - Executive Director - Basalt, CO
Robert R Bryan
Forest Synthesis - President/Habitat Conservation Forester - Harpswell, ME
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
- Missoula, MT
Sage Advisors, LLC
- West Chester, PA
San Isabel Land Protection Trust
- Westcliffe, CO
Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation Habitat Trust Fund
- Moose Jaw, SK
Societe de Protection Fonciere de Saint-Adele
Jean-Louis Poirier - President - Saint-Adele, QC
Sportsmen's National Land Trust
- Agawam, MA
Terrafirma RRG LLC
- Burlington, VT
The Greenlands Reserve
- Frisco, CO
The Nature Conservancy, Colorado Field Office
- Boulder, CO
The Wilderness Land Trust
Brad Borst - President - Bainbridge Island, WA
Trust for Public Land, Colorado Office
- Denver, CO
Trust for Public Land, Washington State Office
- Seattle, WA
Watershed Land Trust
Frank Austenfeld, J.D. - Executive Director - Belton, MO
Local Working Groups
Crawford area Gunnison Sage-grouse Working Group
Nathan Seward - Conservation Biologist - Gunnison, CO
Gunnison Basin Sage Grouse Working Group
Nathan Seward - Conservation Biologist - Gunnison, CO
Keep It Colorado (formerly Colorado Coalition of Land Trusts)
Melissa Daruna - Exeuctive Director - Golden, CO
Middle Park Sage Grouse Committee
Michelle Cowardin - Conservation Biologist - Hot Sulphur Springs, CO
Northern Eagle - Southern Routt Work Group
Liza Rossi - Conservation Biologist - Steamboat Springs, CO
Mitigation Banks
Bio-Logical Capital
Grant McCargo - Managing Director, Founder and CEO - Denver, CO
Eco-Asset Solutions & Innovations LLC
William Coleman - Co-Founder & CEO - Redwood City, CA
Finger Rock Preserve, LLC.
Ren Martyn - Steamboat Springs, CO
Front Range Umbrella Mitigation Bank
Restoration Systems, LLC - Ray Holz - Raleigh, NC
Restoration Systems
- Raleigh, NC
Robert Veldman
K·Coe Conservation - Senior Land Management Consultant - Loveland, CO
Westervelt Ecological Services
Lucy Harrington - Rocky Mountain Regional Manager - Centennial, CO
Natural Resource Law Attorneys
Alison E. Wente
Holland & Hart LLP - Associate - Aspen, CO
Allan Beezley
Allan C. Beezley, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Amanda Hemmerich
Burns, Figa & Will - Associate - Greenwood Village, CO
Beth Appleton
Elizabeth P. Appleton, PC - Crested Butte, CO
Bradley Raffle
Conservation Capital - CEO - Eugene, OR
Bradley Switzer
Law Offices of Bradley N. Switzer - Montrose, CO
Brandon L. Jensen
Budd–Falen Law Offices, LLC - Senior Associate - Cheyenne, WY
Cameron A. Grant
Lyons Gaddis Kahn Hall Jeffers Dworak & Grant PC - Longmont, CO
Christina R. Sloan
The Sloan Law Firm, PLLC - Moab, UT
Christopher G. Hayes
The Hayes Law Firm LLC - Denver, CO
Christopher R. Stork
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
Conservation Law Center
Christian Freitag - Director - Bloomington, IN
Daniel F. Fitzgerald
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Danielle L. Van Arsdale
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
David C. Conley, PC
- Colorado Springs, CO
David F. Bower
Johnson & Repucci LLP - Louisville, CO
David L. Kuosman
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
David Lawrence Kueter
Holsinger Law, LLC - Attorney - Denver, CO
Debra A. Conroy
Keller Law, LLC - Craig, CO
Endangered Species Law and Policy Group
Nossaman LLP - Los Angeles, CA
Eric Gross
Eric J Gross Attorney P.C. - Carbondale, CO
Ernie F. Fazekas
Folkestad Fazekas Barrick & Patoile, P.C. - Castle Rock, CO
Ezekiel (Zeke) J. Williams
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese, PC - Denver, CO
Franklin J. Falen
Budd-Falen Law Offices, L.L.C. - Cheyenne, WY
Gabriella Stockmayer
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Gary L. Greer
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Gregory A. Vallin
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP - Denver, CO
Gregory J Cucrola
Law Offices of Gregory J Cucarola - Sterling, CO
Gregory K. Hoskin
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Harvey W. Curtis
Harvey W. Curtis & Associates - Englewood, CO
Jack D. Palma, II
Holland & Hart LLP - Of Counsel - Cheyenne, WY
James P. Moorhead
Moorhead Law Group, LLC - Founder and Principal - Chicago, IL
Jason M. Groves
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
Jenifer E. Scoggin
Holland & Hart LLP - Of Counsel - Cheyenne, WY
Jenna H. Keller
Keller Law, LLC - Craig, CO
Jessica E. Jay
Conservation Law, P.C - Attorney at Law - Evergreen, CO
John H. Birkeland
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
John P. Justus
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Karl F. Kumli III
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Kate Ryan
Berg Hill Greenleaf Ruscitti - Attorney - Boulder, CO
Kellie Nelson Fetter
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Kent Holsinger
Holsinger Law, LLC - Denver, CO
Kevin L. Patrick
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Waterlaw - Aspen, CO
L. Richard (Dick) Bratton
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, Professional Corporation - Gunnison, CO
Laurie A. Cahill
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
Lawrence Kueter
The Law Office of Lawrence R. Kueter - Attorney - Denver, CO
Leah K. Martinsson
Berg Hill Greenleaf & Ruscitti LLP - Special Counsel - Boulder, CO
Lee Fanyo
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese P.C. - Denver, CO
M. Reed Hopper
Pacific Legal Foundation - Principal Attorney, National Litigation Center - Sacramento, CA
Mark D. Detsky
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Meghan N. Winokur
Holland & Hart LLP - Associate - Aspen, CO
Melinda Beck
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese P.C. - Denver, CO
Misti Schmidt
Conservation Partners LLP - Partner - Oakland, CA
Mountain States Legal Foundation
William Perry Pendley - President and COO - Lakewood, CO
Murray D. Feldman
Holland & Hart - Partner - Boise, ID
Paul L. Noto
Patrick, Miller aned Noto - Basalt, CO
Paul M. Seby
Holland & Hart - Partner - Denver, CO
Paul Sachs P.C.
- Attorney at Law - Steamboat Springs, CO
Peter D. Nichols
Berg Hill Greenleaf Ruscitti, LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
Peter G. Koclanes
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Peter Thomas, Esq
Praxidice Law - Principal and Founder - Aspen, CO
Polly Jessen
Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell LLP - Partner - Denver, CO
Rebecca Hall
Packard and Dierking, LLC - Boulder, CO
Richard L. Emmett
- Durango, CO
Richard L. Reichstei
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP - Partner - Boulder, CO
Robert Noone
Noone Law Firm - Glenwood Springs, CO
Ronald M. Eddy
Sherman & Howard L.L.C. - Denver, CO
Sandra A. Snodgrass
Holland & Hart LLP - Partner - Denver, CO
Sara J Streight LLC
Attorney - Fort Collins, CO
Sarah Rockwell
Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell LLP - Partner - Denver, CO
Scott C. Miller
Patrick, Miller and Noto - Basalt, CO
Scott Clark
Burns, Figa & Will - CEO/Shareholder - Greenwood Village, CO
Star L. Waring
Dietze and Davis, P.C. - Boulder, CO
Stephen J. Small, Esq.
Law Office of Stephen J. Small, Esq., P.C. - Cambridge, MA
Steven J. Bushong
Porzak, Browning & Bushong, LLP - Boulder, CO
Steven K. Imig
Lewis, Bess, Williams & Weese - Denver, CO
Steven P. Jeffers
Lyons Gaddis Kahn Hall Jeffers Dworak & Grant PC - Longmont, CO
Thomas J Ragonetti
Otten, Johnson, Robinson, Neff & Ragonetti PC - Shareholder - Denver, CO
W. Alan Schroeder
Schroeder Law - Lawyer/owner - Boise, ID
Waterlaw Patrick, Miller and Noto
Kevin L. Patrick - Denver, CO
William A. Hillhouse II
Hoskin Farina & Kampf, PC - Grand Junction, CO
William G. Myers III
Holland & Hart - Partner - Boise, ID
William H. Caile
Holland & Hart - Of Counsel - Denver, CO
William Hutton
Conservation Partners LLP - Of Council - Oakland, CA
William Silberstein
Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell - Partner - Denver, CO
Willis V. Carpenter
Carpenter & Klatskin, P.C. - Denver, CO
State Funding / Technical Resources
Colorado Building Farmers
Project Director - Dawn Thilmany - Longmont, CO
Colorado Department of Agriculture
- Broomfield, CO
Colorado Environmental Pesticide Education Program
Colorado State University - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Forest Legacy Program
Joseph A. Duda - Dupty State Forester - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Forest Products Program
Kristina Hughes - Program Administrator - Broomfield, CO
Colorado Natural Heritage Program
David Anderson - Director and Chief Scientist - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission
- Denver, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Golden Field Office
- Golden, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Boulder Field Office
- Longmont, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Cañon City Field Office
- Cañon City, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Granby Field Office
- Granby, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Salida Field Office
- Salida, CO
Colorado State Forest Service Woodland Park Field Office
- Woodland Park, CO
Colorado Tree Farm Program
- Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Wetlands for Wildlife Program
Brian Sullivan - Wetlands Program Coordinator - Fort Collins, CO
Colorado Wildlife Habitat Protection Program
Amanda Nims - Denver, CO
Colorado Wood Utilization and Marketing Program
Susan Matthews - Forest Management Division Supervisor - Fort Collins, CO
Conservation Services Division - Colorado Department of Agriculture
Cindy Lair - State Conservation Program Manager - Broomfield, CO
Cooperative Habitat Improvement Program (CHIP)
Colorado Division of Wildlife - Fort Collins, CO
Forest Agricultural Classification Program
Colorado State Forest Service - Fort Collins, CO
Forest Stewardship Program
- Fort Collins, CO
Game Damage Program
Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Denver, CO
Grand Junction Field Office of the Colorado State Forest Service
- Grand Junction, CO
Habitat Partnership Program
Pat Tucker - Colorado Parks & Wildlife, State Coordinator - Grand Junction, CO
Hunter Education Shooting Range Small Grant Program
Todd Schmidt, Hunter Education Coordinator - Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Denver, CO
Lesser Prairie Chicken Habitat Improvement Program (LPCHIP)
Colorado Parks and WildlifeCO
Lesser Prairie Chicken Range-wide Conservation Plan
Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies - Boise, ID
Petroleum Storage Tank Fund
- Denver, CO
Ranching for Wildlife
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Denver, CO
Recovery & Conservation Plans
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Denver, CO
Southern Rockies Fire Science Network (SRFSN)
Gloria Edwards, SRFSN Program Coordinator - Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship - Fort Collins, CO
Tammy VerCauteren
Executive Director, Administration - Prairie Partners Program - Fort Collins, CO
The Conservation Plan for Grassland Species
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Denver, CO
Walk-in Access Program
Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Denver, CO
Wetland Wildlife Conservation Program
Brian Sullivan, Wetlands Program Coordinator - Colorado Parks and Wildlife - Fort Collins, CO
USDA - FSA Programs
Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Biomass Crop Assistance Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Conservation Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Farm Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Emergency Forest Restoration Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Farm Operating Loans & Microloans
USDA Farm Service Agency - Washington, DC
Farm Ownership Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Farmable Wetlands Program (FWP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
Grassland Reserve Program- REPEALED
USDA Farm Service Agency
Guaranteed Farm Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Livestock Forage Disaster Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
Livestock Indemnity Program
USDA FSA
Microloans
USDA Farm Service Agency
Minority and Women Farmers and Ranchers Loans
USDA Farm Service Agency - Washington, DC
Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program
Source Water Protection Program
USDA Farm Service Agency
State Acres for Wildlife Enhancement
USDA Farm Service Agency - Washington, DC
Transition Incentives Program (TIP)
USDA Farm Service Agency
USDA StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity
- Washington, DC
USDA - NRCS Programs
Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP)
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Colorado Conservation Stewardship Program
Eugene Backhaus - State Resource Conservationist - Denver, CO
Colorado Environmental Quality Incentives Program
Debra M Molinaro - FA Program Manager - Denver, CO
Colorado Grassland Reserve Program
- Denver, CO
Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG)
- Washington, DC
Conservation Security Program
Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP)
Conservation Technical Assistance (CTA)
NRCS
Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP)
Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP)
USDA NRCS
EQIP Organic Initiative
Lindsay Haines - EQIP Specialist for Organic
Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program (FRPP)- REPEALED
Farm Pilot Project Coordination, Inc.
- Tampa, FL
Grassland Reserve Program (GRP) REPEALED
Healthy Forest Reserve Program
Natural Resources Conservation Service - Washington, DC
Healthy Forests Reserve Program (HFRP)
USDA NRCS
James E. 'Bud' Smith Plant Materials Center
Brandon Carr - PMC Manager - Knox City, TX
Kentucky Conservation Stewardship Program
KY
Longleaf Pine Initiative
NRCS - Washington, DC
Los Lunas Plant Materials Center
Bernadette Cooney - PMC Manager - Los Lunas, NM
Manhattan Plant Materials Center
Fred Cummings - PMC Manager - Manhattan, KS
NRCS National Water Quality Initiative
- Washington, DC
Ogallala Aquifer Initiative
Barry Frantz - Coordinator - Washington, DC
Platte River Ag Services, Inc.
Ron Zurlinden, P.E. - Owner - Golden, CO
Regional Conservation Partnership Program
- Washington, DC
Small scale solutions for your farm
USDA - NRCS - Washington, DC
The Lesser Prairie Chicken Initiative
USDA-NRCS - Marysville, KS
USDA StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity
- Washington, DC
USDA-NRCS Colorado
Clint Evans - State Conservationist (STC) - Denver, CO
Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentives Program (VPA-HIP)
NRCS
Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program (WREP)
Lisa McCauley - Program Manager - Washington, DC
Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP)- REPEALED
- Washington, DC
Working Lands for Wildlife
Tim Griffiths - Bozeman, MT
USDA Programs - Other
Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Development Program
Denis Ebodaghe - National Program Leader - Division of Agricultural Systems - Kansas City, MO
Farm Labor Housing Loans and Grants
USDA Rural Development
Farmers Market Promotion Program
USDA Agricultural Marketing Service - Washington, DC
Food Linc
Jim Barham - USDA Rural Development - Washington, DC
Local Food Promotion Program
Nicole Nelson Miller - LFPP Program Manager - Washington, DC
Rural Development Loan Programs
USDA Rural Development - Washington, DC
Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program
- Washington, DC
The Advanced Biofuel Payment Program
Rural Business-Cooperative Service, USDA - Washington, DC
The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP)
USDA Rural Development - Renewable Energy Systems & Energy Efficiency Improvement Guaranteed Loans & Grants - Washington, DC
USDA StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity
- Washington, DC
Value-Added Producer Grant Program
USDA Office of Rural Development
Western SARE
- Bozeman, MT
Wildlife / Habitat Specialists
Barry Rhea
Rhea Environmental Consulting - Owner, primary consultant - Mancos, CO
Basin Wildlife Consulting
Rick Danvir - Casper, WY
Conservation Science Partners - Colorado Headquarters
Brett Dickson, PhD - President & Chief Scientist - Fort Collins, CO
Dan Prenzlow
Colorado Parks & Wildlife - Southeast Region Manager - Colorado Springs, CO
Dawn Reeder
Rare Earth Sciences, LLC - Principal Biologist - Paonia, CO
Ecoresource Solutions Inc
Tony Byrne - President/Principal Ecologist - Arvada, CO
ESCO Associates Inc.
David Buckner, PhD - Boulder, CO
Frederick Environmental Consulting, LLC
David Frederick - Pagosa Springs, CO
George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center (Sutton Center)
- Bartlesville, OK
Greg Simons
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Wildlife Biologist - San Angelo, TX
Headwaters Partners, LLC
Travis Morse - Denver, CO
Kelly Colfer
Western Bionomics, Inc. - President - Steamboat Springs, CO
Kit H. Buell
Buell Environmental LLC - Ecologist - Oak Creek, CO
Lannie B. Philley, AFM
Delta Land & Farm Mgmt Co, LLC - Appraiser, Manager - Mer Rouge, LA
Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc.
James Schriever - Vice President Geospatial Services - Woodland Park, CO
Patty Knupp
Area Biologist - USDA-NRCS Area Three Office - Pueblo, CO
Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV)
- Erie, CO
Robert Veldman
K·Coe Conservation - Senior Land Management Consultant - Loveland, CO
Roe Ecological Services, LLC
Chris and Kelly Roe - Logan, KS
Ruben Cantu
Wildlife Consultants, Inc. - Certified Wildlife Biologist, Certified Professional Rangeland Management - San Angelo, TX
Seth Gallagher
Sage Grouse Initiative - Field Capacity and Delivery Coordinator - Fort Collins, CO
SME Environmental, Inc.
Sean Moore - Principal - Durango, CO
Society for Range Management
- Littleton, CO
Steve Boyle
BIO-Logic, Inc. - Principal & Senior Biologist - Montrose, CO
Terri Schulz
The Nature Conservancy in Colorado - Director of Landscape Science and Management - Denver, CO
Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Lesser Prairie-Chicken
Sean Kyle - Lesser Prairie Chicken Program Manager - Topeka, KS

 Wildlife Best Management Practices

   
Show Articles on Wildlife Best Management Practices (23)
Mowing and Management: Best Practices for Monarchs
By:

Understanding when monarchs are present allows land managers to time management practices like burning, mowing, grazing, or targeted pesticide application when they are least likely to harm monarchs.

 

A talk with Carter Smith of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
By:

Watch and listen to a talk with Carter Smith the Executive Director and Tom Harvey the Deputy Director of Communications of the Texas Parks ...

 

Better Grazing Through Burning
By:

“The prairie has to have fire or it’s going to be gone—we’re going to lose it to the encroachment of trees.” Those are the words of rancher Ed Koger of southwest Kansas.

 

Fire Effects Information System

The Fire Effects Information System is an online collection of reviews of the scientific literature about fire effects on plants and animals and about fire regimes of plant communities in the United States. FEIS reviews are based on thorough literature searches, often supplemented with insights from field scientists and managers. FEIS provides reviews that are efficient to use, thoroughly documented, and defensible. Approximately 15 to 30 new or revised reviews are published in FEIS each year. There are 3 types of FEIS reviews:

  1. Species Reviews 
  2. Fire Studies 
  3. Fire Regime Syntheses 

 

Reducing Conflict with Grizzly Bears, Wolves and Elk A Western Landowners’ Guide
By:

This guide has been produced by and for landowners and practitioners constructively engaged in one of the greatest conservation challenges of our time—how to share and manage a wild, working landscape that sustains both people and wildlife.

 

Integrating Bird Conservation into Range Management

This manual is designed to assist resource professionals with integrating birds and their habitat needs into range management and monitoring, and to train landowners and land managers to do the same.& ...

 

Sharing Your Land with Prairie Wildlife
By:

This third edition of this manual (formerly entitled Sharing Your Land With Shortgrass Prairie Birds) is about how to help birds and other wildlife make a living from the land while you do the same.

 

Best Management Practices for Shortgrass Prairie Birds
By:

The information in this guide is designed to guide you in creating and maintaining habitat for 13 bird species of the shortgrass prairie, birds that are in need of conservation efforts.

 

Decontamination Documentation for Cavers
By:

The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) strongly recommends, first and foremost, compliance with all cave closures, advisories, and regulations in all Federal, State,Tribal, and private lands.

 

Bird Conservation in Private Ponderosa Pine Forests

American Bird Conservancy (ABC), in cooperation with the American Forest Foundation, Forest Restoration Partnership, and several other partners, is working with private landowners to implement bird conservation  measures in ponderosa pine habitat throughout the western United States.

 

Working Lands For Wildlife
By:

Through Working Lands for Wildlife —a voluntary, incentive-based effort—the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and its conservation partners will provide landowners with technical and financial assistance to: Restore populations of declining wildlife species.

 

CP 33 Habitat Buffers for Upland Birds

CP-33 Habitat Buffers for Upland Birds is available under the United States Department of Agriculture Continuous Conservation Reserve Program (CCRP).

 

Greater Sage-grouse Comprehensive Conservation Strategy
By:

This Strategy outlines the critical need to develop the associations among local, state, provincial, tribal, and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individual citizens to design and implement cooperative actions to support robust populations of sage-grouse and the landscapes and habitats upon which they depend.

 

Watering Facility Wildlife Escape Ladder Design

 

Recommendations for Responsible Oil and Gas Development
By:

This report outlines sportsmen’s recommendations for responsible energy development in the Rocky Mountain West—a platform and prescription for development that accommodates our energy needs without sacrificing our Western heritage.

 

Conserving lands and prosperity - Seeking a proper balance between conservation and development in the Rocky Mountain West
By:

More than half of the land in the Western United states is managed by state and federal governments (Jackson, 1995). Public lands in the seven Rocky Mountain States alone cover an area roughly 7.5 ...

 

A Landowner's Guide to Wildlife Friendly Fences - How to Build Fence with Wildlife in Mind
By:

 

A Landowner's Guide to Fences and Wildlife - Practical Tips to Make Your Fences Wildlife Friendly
By:

Wyoming Edition  

 

Conservation Assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and Sagebrush Habitats
By:

In this report, the authors assessed the ecological status and potential factors that influenced greater sage-grouse and sagebrush habitats across their entire distribution.& ...

 

Strategies for Managing the Effects of Climate Change on Wildlife and Ecosystems

From The Heinz Center, this 2008 lengthy publication is targeted to land managers who practice adaptive management.

 

Prescribed Fire Associations
By:

A Prescribed Fire Association is a group of landowners and other concerned citizens that form a partnership to conduct prescribed burns. Prescribed burning is the key land management tool used to restore and maintain native plant communities to their former diversity and productivity for livestock production and wildlife habitat.

 

National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative Unified Strategy to Restore Wild Quail
By:

Northern Bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) were once common, even abundant, on farms, rangelands and forests across more than 30 states. Bobwhites have declined an average of 3% per year since 1966, and have virtually disappeared from some northern states.

 

Ecosystem services provided by bats
By:

Review of the available literature on the ecological and economic impact of ecosystem services provided by  bats.

 

 Wildlife Conservation Strategy

   
Show Articles on Wildlife Conservation Strategy (6)
Using Existing Tools to Expand Cooperative Conservation for Candidate Species Across Federal and Non-Federal Lands
By:

For many years the Service has worked with partners to help them develop Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCAs). CCAs primarily have been developed by Federal agencies to cover Federal lands, and several have resulted in conservation efforts that made listing unnecessary.

 

The 2016 Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Conservation Plan Annual Progress Report
By:

In 2014, a new era in wildlife conservation was ushered in with the implementation of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (LPC) Range-wide Conservation Plan (Van Pelt et al.

 

Conserving Wildlife and Crucial Habitat in the West
By:

Policy Resolution 13-04: Western Governors direct the Western Governors’ Wildlife Council to continue its guidance in the development, management and implementation with partners of the state and West-wide CHATs.

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Predictability FAQs
By:

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Implementation Process
By:

 

Working Lands for Wildlife Greater Sage-Grouse
By:

FAQs Including CCAA and SGI Comparison

 

 

 Local News Stories about Wildlife

Local Wildlife Conservation Strategy News Items
MEDIA PACKAGE: Bears are emerging; do your part to be Bear Aware
4/14/2021 3:19:43 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Rebecca Ferrell Branding and Communications Manager 303-291-7764 / 720-595-1449 rebecca.ferrell@state.co.us MEDIA PACKAGE: Bears are emerging in Colorado; do your part to be Bear Aware Bears are emerging in Colorado, and we need your help in asking all Coloradans to be Bear Aware. Each year, bears are lost in our state due solely to human negligence. Living with wildlife is a benefit to living in Colorado, and it's up to all of us to take small steps that can save a bear's life.  Colorado Parks and Wildlife is providing additional resources to assist with your media coverage on being Bear Aware in Colorado this spring, so residents can work towards keeping our bears wild. The link below will open a folder containing: Folder recapping reported bear conflicts in 2020 in Colorado, including sample reports and a progression of reporting in 2020 Helpful brochures and checklists for Living with Bears and Bearproofing Your Home Video and photos from recent bear-human encounters in the state If you need additional images or to schedule an interview, please contact your regional Public Information Officer . Thank you for helping CPW spread the word on the importance of being Bear Aware and making small adjustments to your home and travel routines to keep wildlife in mind. 2021 Spring Bear Aware Materials Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/14/2021 12:30 PM

Bears are emerging in Colorado; do your part to be Bear Aware
4/14/2021 2:14:42 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Rebecca Ferrell Branding and Communications Manager 303-291-7764 / 720-595-1449 rebecca.ferrell@state.co.us Bears are emerging from their dens; please prepare to be bear aware Bears are already emerging from their winter dens in Colorado. Do your part to be Bear Aware and prevent human-bear conflicts by following simple tips to bearproof your homes and vehicles.  DURANGO, Colo. – Someone once said that the only things certain in life are death and taxes. But every spring Colorado Parks and Wildlife adds another item to that list: bears emerging from hibernation.   As the weather continues to warm up throughout Colorado, reports of bear sightings are starting to trickle into wildlife offices throughout the state. So now is the time for everyone in Colorado to shift back into bear-aware mode, said Steve McClung, assistant area wildlife manager for CPW in Durango.   “Please remember, we’re getting back into the season when bears are active,” McClung said. “So please, secure your trash and take down the bird feeders.”   Bird feeders are a major source of bear conflicts. You can instead attract birds naturally with flowering plants and bird baths. Wait until late November to hang feeders again.   Research shows that bears prefer natural sources of food. But they will find sources of human-provided food if it’s available. If bears become habituated to human sources of food they can become dangerous to humans.   CPW also urges residents to report bear problems to local wildlife offices as soon as they see them. If problems are reported early, CPW wildlife officers can use a range of options to deal with the bear. They can tour the neighborhood to look for food sources that are attracting bears, work with residents to correct the situation and set strategies to harass the bear to push it back into wild areas or to trap and move it if necessary. If CPW does not get reports until a bear is breaking into houses or vehicles, officers’ choices are limited.   “The last thing we want to do is put down a bear, every wildlife officer absolutely hates doing that,” McClung said. “So don’t hesitate to call us as soon as you see any bad behavior, even if it appears minor. That gives us a much better opportunity to correct the situation early.” Colorado Parks and Wildlife offers these tips and precautions to help you prevent human/wildlife conflicts: Bearproofing your home: Keep garbage in a well-secured location. Only put out garbage on the morning of pickup. Clean garbage cans regularly to keep them free of food odors: ammonia is effective. Use a bear-resistant trash can or dumpster; available from your trash hauler or on the Internet. If you don't have secure storage, put items that might become smelly into the freezer until trash day. Don't leave pet food or stock feed outside. Bird feeders are a major source of bear/human conflicts. Attract birds naturally with flowers and water baths. Do not hang bird feeders from April 15 to Nov. 15. Do not attract other wildlife by feeding them, such as deer, turkeys or small mammals. Don’t allow bears to become comfortable around your house. If you see one, yell at it, throw things at it, make noise to scare it off. Secure compost piles. Bears are attracted to the scent of rotting food ─ and they'll eat anything. Allow grills to burn for a couple of minutes after cooking to burn off grease and to eliminate odors. Clean the grill after each use. Clean-up thoroughly after picnics in the yard or on the deck. Don't allow food odors to linger. If you have fruit trees, pick fruit before it gets too ripe. Don't allow fruit to rot on the ground. If you keep small livestock, keep animals in a fully covered enclosure. Construct electric fencing if possible. Don’t store livestock food outside, keep enclosures clean to minimize odors, hang rags soaked in ammonia and/or Pine-Sol around the enclosure. If you have bee hives, install electric fencing where allowed. Talk to your neighbors and kids about being bear aware. Keep garage doors closed. Cars, traveling and campsites: Lock your doors when you’re away from home and at night. Keep the bottom floor windows of your house closed when you're not at home. Do not keep food in your vehicle; roll up windows and lock the doors of your vehicles. When car-camping, secure all food and coolers in a locked vehicle when you’re away from camp. Keep a clean camp, whether you’re in a campground or in the back-country. When camping in the back-country, hang food 100 feet or more from campsite; don’t bring any food into your tent Cook food well away from your tent; wash dishes thoroughly. For more information go to the Living with Wildlife section on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife web site: cpw.state.co.us/bears . Should you have questions or need to report bear problems, call your nearest CPW office . Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/14/2021 12:15 PM

Low flows to affect fishing in Dolores River tail-water
4/14/2021 11:59:42 AM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Joe Lewandowski Southwest Region Public Information Officer 970-759-9590 / joe.lewandowski@state.co.us Low flows to affect fishing in Dolores River tail-water   DURANGO, Colo. – Due to continuing drought conditions, trout fishing in the Dolores River below the McPhee Reservoir dam will be adversely affected this year, said a Colorado Parks and Wildlife aquatic biologist.   Water releases from the dam will probably be under 15 cubic feet per second (cfs) and could possibly drop as low at three cfs, explained Jim White, aquatic biologist for Colorado Parks and Wildlife in Durango. In normal years, the sustained release from the dam is usually about 60 cfs. The section of river, which flows through the Lone Dome State Wildlife area, from below the dam to Bradfield Bridge ─ a distance of about 12 miles ─ is a popular tail-water fishery. Most trout fishing is done within the first six miles.   White said the lower flows will shrink the river habitat and many brown and rainbow trout will likely die. The water coming out of the dam is about 42 degrees, which is an ideal temperature for trout. But with such a low flow the water will warm quickly as it moves downstream.   “This is going to impact the trout fishery,” White said. “I would expect to see about half or more of the trout fishery habitat suffer and lose much of the trout population.”   White suggested that anglers fish early in the day and carry a thermometer to check the water temperature. Fishing should stop when the water hits 70 degrees.   The low flows will also affect native fish that live in the lower reaches of the Dolores River ─ the Flannelmouth Sucker, the Bluehead Sucker and the Roundtail Chub. These fish are listed by CPW as species of concern. The fish are adapted to survive in warm water, but they still need pools and flowing water to survive.   White is concerned about lower sections of the river drying up or being connected by only tiny rivulets of water.   “I’m worried that the natives are going to be stuck in isolated pools throughout most of the year at these flows,” White said.   Exacerbating the problem are Smallmouth Bass, an invasive non-native fish that thrives in the lower Dolores but are predators on the young of the native fish. Anglers are encouraged to fish for Smallmouth Bass; they are abundant, fairly easy to catch, tasty and there are no bag or possession limits.   As drought continues to grip the West, more and more rivers will be facing the same scenario – this year and beyond.   “All of this is a result of three things: low snowpack, dry soil that will absorb run-off and no carry-over water in the reservoir from last year,” White said.   Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/14/2021 9:56 AM

CPW seeks volunteers to help clean Turkey Tracks, a 7,930-acre State Trust Land public access hunting area east of Fountain
4/13/2021 3:59:42 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Bill Vogrin Southeast Region Public Information Officer 719-466-3927 / bill.vogrin@state.co.us CPW seeks volunteers to help clean Turkey Track Ranch State Trust Land Turkey Track Ranch is a 7,930-acre State Trust Land and popular public access hunting area southeast of Colorado Springs.  Photo courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife / Phil Gurule April 13, 2021 CPW seeks volunteers to help clean Turkey Track Ranch State Trust Land FOUNTAIN, Colo. – Volunteers are being sought by Colorado Parks and Wildlife to help clean up the Turkey Track Ranch, a 7,930-acre State Trust Land east of Fountain. CPW relies heavily on volunteers to perform a variety of important tasks at its 42 parks and 350 wildlife areas and state trust land. Volunteers also make major contributions to efforts of biologists working with aquatic and terrestrial wildlife. For this project, Wildlife Officer Phil Gurule is seeking volunteers to help clean the perimeter of the popular public access hunting area, specifically several miles along Squirrel Creek Road, South Peyton Highway and Skinner Road. “Our new push for public access puts the responsibility on us to be good stewards of this property,” Gurule said. “We have an obligation to protect the wildlife habitat and the aesthetics of the property. It’s part of building strong community relationships with surrounding landowners.” He hopes to get crews to clean the roadsides and expects it will take a couple days to accomplish. “This is a big undertaking,” Gurule said. “But I know our hunters appreciate getting access to this property and they’ll show up and help us keep it looking nice.” Gurule has scheduled cleanup days on April 24 and May 8. Crews will work from 8 a.m. to noon each day. Crews will walk roadsides and comb the property for trash. In addition to appropriate clothing, water and snacks, volunteers are encouraged to bring reflective vests, trash pickers and five-gallon buckets, if they have them. Appropriate COVID precautions will be followed. Anyone interested in joining the effort is asked to email Jeanette Lara, CPW volunteer coordinator for the Southeast Region, by email at: Jeanette.lara@state.co.us . The volunteer crews will meet at a parking area on Squirrel Creek Road, about 2.5 miles east of the intersection with Peyton Highway. ### PHOTOS: Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife / Phil Gurule   Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/13/2021 1:57 PM

Boat ramp changes at Vega State Park
4/13/2021 12:14:43 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Randy Hampton Northwest Region Public Information Officer 970-640-1647 / randy.hampton@state.co.us BOAT RAMP CHANGES AT VEGA STATE PARK Vega State Park is located on the northern slopes of the Grand Mesa National Forest COLLBRAN, Colo. - Boaters at Vega State Park in Western Colorado will notice some changes when they arrive at the reservoir this year. The changes are part of Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s effort to protect Colorado waters from invasive aquatic species that can do significant damage to water storage and delivery systems. To prevent boats from launching during hours that ANS inspections are not available, the park has installed new gates and one-way spike strips. The spike strips will allow boats to exit the lake after hours at the Island Boat Ramp but will prevent anyone from entering the lake during non-inspection hours. Purchase of the traffic spike strips was funded by Ute Water with installation assistance and materials provided by the Town of Collbran Public Works and the Collbran Job Corps concrete trades training program.  There are three boat ramps at Vega Reservoir - Island, Early Settlers, and Oak Point. Gates at Early Settlers and Oak Point will be locked during non-inspection hours and only the Island ramp will be usable by boaters exiting the water after inspection hours.  Boat inspections hours are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. from May 1 through May 27. Beginning the Friday before Memorial Day weekend (May 28) hours run from 7 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. through Labor Day weekend (Sept. 6). From Sept. 7 through Oct. 31 ANS inspection hours at Vega return to 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Vega is closed to boating from Nov. 1 through the end of April.  “Boaters that plan to exit the lake after inspection hours should park and use the Island boat ramp so that they are not behind locked gates after hours,” said Park Manager James Masek. “It may take boaters a moment to get used to the new system but it’s critically important to protect the waters and keep them open to boating into the future. We appreciate everyone’s cooperation in this effort.”    The Colorado State Legislature approved a bill in 2018 that requires Colorado boat owners who operate motorboats and sailboats on public lakes and reservoirs to purchase a $25 ANS stamp annually. The cost of the stamp for out-of-state motorboats and sailboats is $50. Boaters from out of state can purchase online, at CPW offices, or at over 700 sales locations statewide.   Aquatic nuisance species, such as zebra and quagga mussels, pose a serious threat to natural resources, recreation and the water infrastructure of the state.  Mussel infestations cause a variety of major problems. Because mussels consume plankton, they disrupt the food web and out-compete sport fish and native fish. Mussels clog infrastructure, including reservoir dams, outlet structures and distribution systems that carry water for irrigation, municipal and industrial uses. Mussels also infest boats and damage engines.   Mussels have caused billions of dollars in damage, especially in the upper Midwest. Nearby states where mussel infestations exist include Utah, Arizona, Kansas, Texas, Nebraska and Oklahoma. Invasive mussels could have devastating ecological, economic, and recreational impacts if infestations were to establish here.   A complete list of Colorado inspection sites and hours of operation, along with information about the ANS stamp, can be found on CPW’s boating page . Always check with your destination reservoir before going to verify hours of operation. Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/13/2021 10:13 AM

Mack Mesa Reservoir drained to remove northern pike
4/12/2021 2:39:41 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Randy Hampton Northwest Region Public Information Officer 970-640-1647 / randy.hampton@state.co.us MACK MESA DRAINED TO REMOVE NORTHERN PIKE Mack Mesa Reservoir is part of Highline Lake State Park. Highline Lake will not be impacted by the Mack Mesa project and the park remains open for boating, fishing, camping and all other activities. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - In response to the discovery of northern pike in Mack Mesa Reservoir at Highline Lake State Park, Colorado Parks and Wildlife is draining Mack Mesa Reservoir. Work to drain Mack Mesa has begun and will continue for several weeks. The lake will be slowly drained to protect infrastructure and to effectively remove other species of fish for transfer to Highline Lake. Mack Mesa Reservoir is a small lake just north of the larger Highline Lake. Highline Lake will not be impacted by the project and will remain open to boaters, anglers, and other recreationists. “Northern pike are a voracious predator that cannot be managed in Mack Mesa,” explained Ben Felt, CPW’s aquatic biologist for the Grand Junction area. “Pike will quickly decimate other fish in the lake, including trout, black crappie, largemouth bass, bluegill, and channel catfish reared and stocked through CPW’s hatchery system.”  Anglers first reported catching a northern pike last fall and CPW immediately sampled the lake to get an understanding of the situation. Adult pike were removed through fish sampling in the fall. Biologists and park managers were hopeful that these sampling efforts would remove all pike, however additional fish were found during ice off - the time of year when northern pike typically spawn. It is unknown how pike got into Mack Mesa Lake but staff suspects that they were illegally transported and released by someone trying to selfishly create a place to catch their own favorite fish.  “Movement and stocking of fish into Colorado waters by private individuals without CPW approval is against the law,” said Area Wildlife Manager Kirk Oldham. “In addition, CPW does not stock northern pike  in  western Colorado waters because the species is a significant threat to native fish that are found only in the Colorado River basin.”  A federal program works to recover four species of endangered fish while continuing to allow the development of Colorado water for agriculture, drinking water, and other uses in western Colorado. The Upper Colorado River Recovery Program oversees work to recover humpback chub, razorback sucker, bonytail and Colorado pikeminnow. “As the lake is drained, efforts will be made to capture the allowable fish that remain in Mack Mesa and transfer those fish to neighboring Highline Lake for the benefit of anglers,” added Felt. “Any northern pike will be removed.”  Once all fish are removed, Mack Mesa Lake will be refilled and restocked with trout, largemouth bass, black crappie, bluegill, and channel catfish. “We hope to get ahold of some large brood fish to make sure that Mack Mesa will be immediately fishable by anglers in May,” said Highline Lake State Park Manager Alan Martinez. “This disruption for anglers is unfortunate and we hope anyone who loves Mack Mesa will help us keep an eye out for anyone who might illegally move fish here or anywhere else.”  Park staff and wildlife managers discussed the possibility of closing Mack Mesa Lake to public access and considered alternative fish removal techniques but those measures were discounted for multiple reasons, including being too punitive to the many responsible anglers that enjoy the lake. Future incidents could result in closure of the lake to fishing or the suspension of stocking of any fish in Mack Mesa. "This is an unfortunate situation, and one that CPW would prefer not to be in,” said Northwest Region Senior Aquatic Biologist Lori Martin. Martin also expressed frustration that these efforts take away staff time and resources from other important projects that could benefit all anglers on the Western Slope.  Anyone with information about illegal fish stocking is encouraged to contact Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Grand Junction office at 970-255-6100. Park visitors are asked to take note of any suspicious activity, including descriptions of people and vehicle license numbers. Tipsters who wish to remain anonymous can provide information through the Operation Gamethief program by calling 877-265-6648 or by emailing game.thief@state.co.us. Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/12/2021 12:37 PM

Golden trout return to State Forest State Park
4/12/2021 1:54:42 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Randy Hampton Northwest Region Public Information Officer 970-640-1647 / randy.hampton@state.co.us GOLDEN TROUT RETURN TO STATE FOREST STATE PARK A colorful golden trout WALDEN, Colo. - Anglers in northern Colorado are hoping some tiny fish will mean the return of a popular catch at State Forest State Park. About 600 golden trout have been stocked into two high-elevation, backcountry lakes, in the park with the hopes that they’ll grow to catchable size in a few years. Golden trout are the state fish of California and native to the Upper Kern River drainage near Mt. Whitney and Sequoia National Park in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Central California. They were believed extinct by the mid-20th century. The species was originally described by ichthyologist David Starr Jordan in 1892. History buffs will know that Jordan was the first Chancellor of Stanford University. After the golden trout was recovered in California, it was bred in hatcheries and was stocked in lakes within the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah beginning in the 1970s.  From the 1970s up until 1993, golden trout were stocked in Kelly Lake in State Forest State Park but that population - like most golden trout outside of historic stream spawning habitat - were unable to reproduce at self-sustaining levels. By 2000 the golden trout in Kelly Lake had mostly disappeared. Despite their short tenure in Kelly Lake, the reputation of golden trout being a fun-to-catch and brightly colored fish lives on in the memory of area anglers. While golden trout can be found in other lakes in Colorado, the state record golden trout - weighing in at 3.75 pounds and measuring 22 1/2 inches - was caught in Kelly Lake by Donald O’Leary in 1979.  About five years ago, park staff at State Forest and aquatic biologist Kyle Battige decided to take a look at a potential return of golden trout. Conversations with the public took place and habitat assessments were undertaken. Analysis showed that two lakes - Clear Lake and Jewel Lake - would make good homes for the species.  “This was a collaboration between the park, the biological staff, and the public,” said Park Manager Joe Brand. “It took time to make sure this is done properly. Now we’re moving forward and everyone is very excited for this unique backcountry fishing opportunity.” In late fall of 2020 an airplane was used to stock Clear and Jewel with a mix of 1.5” golden trout and small Colorado cutthroats. Clear Lake was stocked with 375 fish and Jewel Lake received about 200 fish. Biologists believe the fish will take approximately three years to reach catchable size (>8”) and after a few more years some may get up to 14” in length.  “Because golden trout aren’t effective at spawning in lake environments, additional stockings will take place to create a multi-year class fishery,” explained CPW Aquatic Biologist Kyle Battige. “We’ll sample the fish every few years to assess their health and growth. It’s anticipated that golden trout will live six to eight years in those lakes.”   Anglers that may venture into these remote, high-mountain lakes are encouraged to give the fish a few years to grow. As a reminder, a state parks pass is required to access the lakes, which are anywhere from a three mile hike (Jewel) to an eight mile hike (Clear) with several thousand feet of elevation gain along the hike. The lakes themselves sit at approximately 11,000 feet above sea level. Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/12/2021 11:50 AM

Even more Colorado state parks will have Agents of Discovery augmented reality missions this spring
4/9/2021 11:59:43 AM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Travis Duncan Statewide Public Information Officer 720-595-8294 / travis.duncan @state.co.us Even more Colorado state parks will have Agents of Discovery augmented reality missions this spring This yellow-bellied marmot named "Agent Raymond" is the mascot for Staunton State Park's augmented reality game. DENVER – Colorado Parks and Wildlife has partnered with Agents of Discovery, an educational mobile gaming platform, to create augmented reality trail missions at 13 state parks. This spring, with social distancing requirements still keeping many families in small units as they venture outdoors, it’s a great time to download the app on your smartphone and try out one of the new missions.   The missions, which task users with accomplishing educational and fun outdoor activities at state parks, can be accessed by smartphone users by downloading the Agents of Discovery app from the App and Play stores. Missions are free to play and, once downloaded, do not require Wi-Fi or a data connection.   Some examples at CPW state parks include: A Prairie Nature Trail mission at Jackson Lake State Park Learn about young wildlife with Cheyenne Mountain State Park’s Spring Babies mission Become a Junior Ranger at Steamboat Lake or St. Vrain state parks Learn about the night sky at Eleven Mile State Park Test your water knowledge at Ridgway and Mancos state parks Go on a scavenger hunt at Lake Pueblo State Park Discover there’s more than just dogs in Chatfield State Park’s Dog Off-Leash Area Staunton State Park even has a mission you can try at home! “Our missions at Barr Lake are all about the eagles right now,” said Barr Lake State Park Manager Michelle Seubert. “This is a great activity for families to get out on the trail and explore these self-guided missions to learn about the park. We also just launched our new mission: The Prairie Welcomes You to Leave No Trace.” Get started by downloading the Agents of Discovery app and visiting one of the state parks below. State parks with augmented reality trail missions Barr Lake Chatfield Cheyenne Mountain Crawford Eleven Mile Jackson Lake Lake Pueblo Mancos Ridgway St. Vrain Staunton​​​​ Steamboat Lake Trinidad Lake About Agents of Discovery Agents of Discovery is an educational mobile gaming platform that uses augmented reality to get youth active. They empower educators in all sectors to turn the whole world into an engaging, fun, and safe learning environment. Educators use the online platform, the Mission Maker, to design their own games. These games (Missions) are then published to the Agents of Discovery app and available from the App and Play stores.    ### Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/9/2021 9:57 AM

Application period now open for Colorado Outdoor Regional Partnerships Initiative Funding Program
4/9/2021 11:04:41 AM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Travis Duncan Statewide Public Information Officer 720-595-8294 / travis.duncan @state.co.us Application period now open for Colorado Outdoor Regional Partnerships Initiative Funding Program DENVER – Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) and Great Outdoors Colorado are collaborating to fund coalitions working to protect Colorado’s land, water, and wildlife through the Colorado Outdoor Regional Partnerships Initiative. Governor Jared Polis signed the Executive Order creating the Initiative at the opening of Fishers Peak State Park last October . CPW, in collaboration with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources and the Colorado Outdoor Partnership (CO-OP), is leading an effort to advance conservation and recreation for our public and private lands and waters in a manner that ensures our communities are healthy, livable and prosperous for future generations. This funding program will support new and existing coalitions who will collaborate with the CO-OP and are committed to the following: Conserving wildlife and natural resources Ensuring sustainable outdoor recreation opportunities Convening a broad representation of outdoor related interests “We are pleased to advance this important, collaborative effort,” said CPW Director Dan Prenzlow. “It will bring stakeholders together from across the spectrum of the outdoors to lead local and statewide planning that balances the conservation of our state’s tremendous natural resources with the outdoor recreation experiences that we all value in Colorado.” The funding application is available online at OutdoorPartnershipsSpring2021 . Applications are due May 20, 2021. Awards announcements will be made by the end of June 2021. For more information, including application instructions and templates for a timeline and budget, please see the Regional Partnerships Initiative page on the CPW website.    ### Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/9/2021 9:00 AM

CPW's version of 'March Madness' ends with Lake Pueblo reporting a record walleye spawn; it's great news a year after COVID-19 aborted CPW efforts
4/8/2021 4:44:44 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Bill Vogrin Southeast Region Public Information Officer 719-466-3927 / bill.vogrin@state.co.us LAKE PUEBLO PRODUCES RECORD WALLEYE SPAWN A YEAR AFTER COVID-19 ABORTED CPW'S EFFORTS Colorado Parks and Wildlife's Josh Nehring, senior aquatic biologist for the Southeast Region, displays a large walleye during the "March Madness" walleye spawn at Lake Pueblo State Park. Photo courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife April 9, 2021 Lake Pueblo produces record walleye spawn a year after COVID-19 aborted CPW efforts PUEBLO, Colo. – While college basketball fans sit glued to their televisions each March, Colorado Parks and Wildlife plays its own version of "March Madness."  Without fanfare, betting brackets or “One Shining Moment” tributes, CPW biologists and volunteers head out at dawn, usually in freezing temperatures, to Front Range reservoirs and spend a month capturing thousands of walleye and spawning them in a quest for Colorado anglers’ precious aquatic prize.  This March, CPW collected approximately 130 million eggs – a slam dunk for anglers statewide. It’s particularly great news after last year’s disappointing, pandemic-shortened spawn produced only a tiny fraction of the usual haul. “Honestly, it’s hard to believe what our team of aquatic biologists, other CPW staff, and three volunteers were able to accomplish this year at Lake Pueblo State Park,” said Josh Nehring, senior aquatic biologist for CPW’s Southeast Region. “We weren’t sure what to expect. But we never expected to catch so many fish and produce so many eggs, so fast. “It’s remarkable. And anglers ought to be thrilled because it’s going to mean great fishing in the coming years in Colorado.” Most every spring, CPW holds its March Madness at three state parks: Lake Pueblo, Cherry Creek and Chatfield. There, three teams of aquatic biologists deploy at dawn each day for most of the month, working seven days a week in sun, rain and often snow, to gill-net hundreds of walleye each day. They strip the popular gamefish, one slippery walleye after another, of their milt and roe (sperm and eggs) as the fish wriggle furiously in the biologists’ cold, wet hands. The eggs are fertilized in a boathouse at Lake Pueblo, or on a floating barge at Cherry Creek and Chatfield. Then the fertilized eggs – often millions a day – are sent to CPW hatcheries where they are hatched and nurtured until the fry and fingerlings are ready to be stocked in waters across Colorado. Typically the grueling routine is repeated daily until they’ve produced about 120 million eggs. Only when the goal is reached can the madness end. Why does CPW go to all the effort? Because anglers love walleye for the valiant fight they put up on the end of a line and for the way they taste at the end of a fork. The walleye eggs also are valuable as CPW’s hatchery staff trade them to other states in exchange for desirable gamefish otherwise unavailable in Colorado. The annual effort has gone on since 1988 at Lake Pueblo and, in normal years, involves a small army of CPW aquatic biologists, other staff and volunteers who typically spend hours each day alongside the biologists untangling dozens of nets – each longer than a football field – deployed each afternoon and left overnight in the lakes for the next morning’s catch. Then, a year ago, came COVID-19 forcing a sudden stop to the spawning operation. One day into the 2020 walleye spawn, CPW aborted operations as the worldwide pandemic reached Colorado. Anglers feared their prized catch would quickly disappear without the human-assisted spawning  operation. Sure, the walleye in the three lakes would still spawn without human interference. But the survival rate of walleye eggs spawned naturally in the lake can be as low as 10 percent while eggs gathered and fertilized by CPW aquatic biologists is typically as high as 80 percent.  "That’s why CPW and its predecessor agencies began spawning fish several decades ago," Nehring said. "And the modern operation has helped boost walleye populations and ensures great fishing for anglers." So there was great pressure on CPW’s Team Walleye as it began operations this year. That pressure was made worse by the decision to limit participation to just a core group of biologists and only three longtime volunteers: Russ Dewey, Mark Elkins and Dan Frankowski.  Those three volunteers each have decades of experience – Frankowski first volunteered at the Lake Pueblo boathouse in 1990 – and all were vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. And everyone wore masks for protection. In a further safety precaution, the net reefing operation was moved out of the cramped boathouse and into an open-air parking lot. It was a stark contrast to past years when a large support staff and larger team of volunteers arrived each morning before dawn to expedite the spawn and to let the biologists concentrate on catching and squeezing the fish. Perhaps the volunteers’ biggest contribution is the chore of “reefing” the nets. They drag 32 heavy tubs, each holding a 400-foot-long gill net, and start hours of reefing -- the process of untangling the massive nets.  The work starts by taking one end of the long net and tossing it over a large plastic pipe hanging from the rafters of the boathouse. Then they stand and pull the 400-feet of net over the tube, inch by inch, removing tree branches, debris and even old fishing lures, as they slowly and carefully place it into a new tub. Along the way they also make repairs to netting ripped by the debris. This year, however, the 14-member Team Walleye was responsible for most of the prep work, rinse stations, all the sorting and counting. And with only three volunteers, the CPW Team Walleye biologists spent what would normally be their lunch hours standing in the parking lot reefing nets so they could take them back out on the lake to be set for the next morning. But as bad as 2020 was for Team Walleye, the 2021 season was great. Nehring said the overall walleye catch at Lake Pueblo was among the best in decades. It took only a few days for the Pueblo team to blow past its goal of 40 million eggs. The walleye, and the eggs, just kept piling up. This turned out to be especially important because CPW had decided in advance not to spawn at Chatfield this year and the effort at Cherry Creek was partially held back due to COVID-19 concerns. Carrie Tucker, aquatic biologist based in Pueblo, said she’d never seen so many walleye. “It was an absolutely monster year,” Tucker said. “We’ve never gotten so many fish, day after day. It was great to be back on the water. And it’s great to know our anglers are going to have a lot of success catching fish this summer.” The number of fish netted each day kept growing until Nehring, Tucker and the team spawned 156 female walleyes on March 26. They were so surprised they wrote the number on cardboard and placed it in the rafters of the boathouse, noting it exceeded the previous record of 130 female walleye spawned in one day in 2019. In all, Team Walleye beat the 2019 record for daily female spawns three times in 2021.  The box score showed that in a quick 16 days, they had produced 90 million eggs from Lake Pueblo --  by far the majority of CPW’s 2021 statewide total of 131 million eggs.  The team also ran up the score by exceeding 9 million eggs produced on 3 days. Their best was 9.8 million March 29.  They further stuffed the stat sheet by producing 6 million sterile "triploids." The triploid is a sterile walleye hybrid. CPW aquatic biologists like triploids because they can be stocked in West Slope waters without fear of reproducing and competing with native fish. Another benefit of the record walleye spawn was the production of 32.4 million saugeye. It’s a hybrid made from sauger milt from Nebraska and Colorado walleye eggs. The saugeye loves shallow water making it a favorite among shore anglers. In the college basketball March Madness, colorful confetti fell on the winners as they cut down the nets at the end of the tournament. Only a light snow fell on Team Walleye as the biologists folded up the last nets on March 31, ending CPW's version of March Madness.  ### PHOTOS: Courtesy of Colorado Parks and Wildlife Captions: Colorado Parks and Wildlife aquatic biologists and technicians head out at dawn to begin pulling gill nets set the previous afternoon to collect walleye for the day's spawn. A small boathouse in Lake Pueblo State Park hosts CPW's March Madness as aquatic biologists bring in their catch of walleye to be sorted, stripped of their milt and roe, the eggs fertilized and nets untangled in a month-long marathon. It's cold, wet work onboard the CPW boats as aquatic biologists, technicians and wildlife officers pull in 32 gill nets, each longer than football field, remove walleye and other fish from them as well as tree branches and other debris. CPW's Josh Nehring, senior aquatic biologist for the Southeast Region, reacts to the large volume of roe, or eggs, he is able to squeeze from a female walleye. CPW's Carrie Tucker, aquatic biologist in Pueblo, handled much of the duty stripping milt and roe from walleye caught each day. CPW Volunteers Mark Elkins, a retired CPW terrestrial biologist, and Dan Frankowski "reef" or untangle the gill nets in a deserted boathouse. When the first boat arrives with the catch of the morning, they moved their operation to a parking lot. Frankowski has been volunteering at the Lake Pueblo walleye spawn since 1990. CPW Volunteers Mark Elkins, a retired CPW terrestrial biologist, and Dan Frankowski are joined by Team Walleye members who spend their lunch hours reefing nets to ensure all 32 of the 400-foot-long nets are ready to go back into the lake that afternoon. Three longtime CPW volunteers - Russ Dewey, Mark Elkins and Dan Frankowski - pose with Carrie Tucker, (far right) aquatic biologist in Pueblo.  A light snow fell on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife walleye team on the final day of operations at Lake Pueblo State Park. ### VIDEO: Watch the process of the eggs from the walleye spawn arriving at the Wray Hatchery to how we ship them out the door as fry to be stocked in lakes and reservoirs across the state. Here's the link:  https://youtu.be/QVH-e9yEbQo   Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/8/2021 2:42 PM

Colorado Parks and Wildlife urges paddleboarders to be safe on the water
4/8/2021 2:34:42 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Joe Lewandowski Southwest Region Public Information Officer 970-759-9590 / joe.lewandowski@state.co.us Paddleboarders are urged to wear PFDs when they are on the water. Paddleboarders urged to wear to wear PFDs  RIDGWAY, Colo. – As stand-up paddleboards become more and more popular, Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds paddlers to wear personal floatation devices (PFDs) when using this watercraft.   Over the last several years at Colorado’ state parks, more and more people have been falling off their boards and some have drowned. In all those cases people were not wearing PFDs.   “So many people see paddle boards as low risk; but if you fall off your board into cold water you can get into trouble very quickly,” said Kirstin Copeland, manager at Ridgway State Park.   On rivers or reservoirs, if a paddleboarder falls off there is no guarantee that the board will remain within reach. In rivers, the board can be pulled away by the current. In lakes, a board can be pushed away quickly by the wind.   The danger is amplified on reservoirs and ponds in the afternoons in Colorado when winds pick-up or fast-moving storms stir up waves. Water temperature is also a factor. Even though the weather has been warm, the spring run-off is just starting and water in rivers and reservoirs is only about 50 degrees or lower. Cold water quickly impairs swimming ability and can cause hypothermia.   According to CPW regulations, on any watercraft the number of life jackets on board must match the number of passengers. Anyone 13 years or younger must wear a life jacket at all times. Every kind of craft is subject to the regulations, including powerboats, paddleboards, kayaks, canoes, sailboats and sailboards.   In the last two years at Ridgway reservoir, four adults who were not wearing PFDs had to be rescued by park rangers after failing off their boards. In addition, two youngsters who were wearing adult-sized life jackets also had to be rescued. The ill-fitting PFDs did not support them in the water properly. Children must be fitted with properly sized PFDs.   “Anything can happen at any time on the water. So we urge people to be cautious and consider their own safety and their loved one’s safety while they’re enjoying the water,” Copeland said. “Please, wear your PFD.”   For more information about safe boating, go to: http://cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/BoatingSafety.aspx .   Listen to CPW’s PODCAST on boating safety: https://art19.com/shows/colorado-outdoors/episodes/ec80b994-4eb8-4484-abea-b2b86a747c0b .   Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/8/2021 12:29 PM

Phase 1 of the bike park remodel at Lory State Park has begun
4/8/2021 7:44:41 AM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Jason Clay Northeast Region Public Information Officer 303-291-7234 / jason.clay@state.co.us   @CPW_NE Phase 1 of the bike park remodel at Lory State Park has begun Volunteers and financial assistance still needed to complete enhanced bike park design, which envisions first-of-its-kind amenities for a Colorado State Park |  Friends of Lory State Park website BELLVUE, Colo.   – Colorado Parks and Wildlife,  Friends of Lory State Park  (FoLSP) and partners  TREK North  in Fort Collins,  J2 Contracting ,  Drake Cycles  and  Overland Mountain Bike Association  (OMBA) broke ground on a revitalized Corral Center Bike Park at Lory State Park this week.   Once completed, the updated bike park will be the first of its kind at any Colorado State Park. Thanks to a successful raffle that featured a donated TREK Roscoe 7 Mountain Bike and raised almost $10,000, the project partners will have enough funds to jump start Phase 1 of the project. However, more support will be needed to complete the total $50,000 bike park revitalization. “We are excited to start phase 1 of the bike park project," said Park Manager Roy McBride. "We've uncovered from the snow and the ground has thawed, allowing crews to begin moving the dirt jumps. In the meantime, we are working with our partners to secure additional funding to complete phase 2. If the additional funding is raised, we hope to complete phase 2 by the end of the 2021 summer season.”   The bike park at Lory State Park will be closed until construction of the new jumps and pump track is completed, which is anticipated to take about a week. “Improving the former horse corral to a bike skills arena has been on our drawing board for several years,” explained FoLSP Board President, Patricia Miller. “We are excited to continue working with Debbie Posewitz of TREK, Eric Drake of Drake Cycles, Kenny Bearden from OMBA, Chance Brown of J2 Contracting, CPW and many others in realizing a new upscale park, adapted for beginners and experienced mountain bikers to hone their skills.” Chance Brown, owner of J2 Contracting, is lending his expertise to the project as the lead designer. Many other individuals and groups are supporting the design and construction efforts as well, including Cameron Landis and other Lory State Park staff, Send Town Bike Club, OMBA, TREK, and Drake Cycles. Phase 1 will cost around $7,500, which means that the proceeds from the October 2020 TREK Bicycle Raffle that raised $9,905 will cover the initial construction. The plan is to use existing on-site dirt to improve and enlarge the start hill and construct a pump track and small/medium dirt jump lines. It was determined that these three areas would cater to nearly the entire Lory State Park bike rider population. Phase 1 will also include updated signage with maps, rules and safety information. Additionally, enhanced landscaping will make the area more suitable for spectators at future events.  Phase 2, which will require an influx of an additional $40,000, will include the construction of a large dirt jump line using steel framed wooden jump lips and a curved wall ride. The park designers plan to add five of these structures and their associated landings.  “Free dirt for rough grading the large dirt jump landings translates into more trail surfacing that can be purchased or imported," Brown emphasized as being critical for Phase 2 of the project. "Having additional surfacing for future maintenance is critical to the success of the park.”  Landscaping donations to help with shade and general park aesthetics will also be gladly accepted. FoLSP is extremely grateful for the nearly 300 donors who participated in the October raffle, thereby jump-starting Phase 1 of the project. The Friends group is already pursuing additional funding sources for Phase 2 as well, including a Partners in the Outdoors Grant, Colorado Gives initiatives, business sponsorships and potentially another bike raffle in Summer/Fall 2021. Sara Abernathy, the winner of the TREK Roscoe 7 raffle, is very appreciative of the Lory State Park staff and community partners for their efforts.   “We love Lory because of the fun features, well-built trails with different difficulties, and the ability to get away from town to recreate," she said. "It's so gorgeous." To support the Friends of Lory State Park and the Corral Center Bike Park, please visit  https://www.loryfriends.org/support-your-friends-and-support-your-park/ . For more information about the project, please contact FoLSP at 970-235-2045 or email  loryspfriends@gmail.com     Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/8/2021 5:39 AM

Colorado Parks and Wildlife extends primary draw application deadline until Friday, April 9 at 8 p.m.
4/7/2021 4:04:42 PM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Travis Duncan Statewide Public Information Officer 720-595-8294 / travis.duncan @state.co.us Colorado Parks and Wildlife extends primary draw application deadline until Friday, April 9 at 8 p.m. DENVER – Hunters hoping to draw a big-game license in Colorado in 2021 will now have until Fri., April 9 at 8 p.m. MT to apply in the primary draw due to volume-related technological issues that kept some hunters from being able to apply before the original deadline of April 6 at 8 p.m. “We’re going to do what’s right for our hunters,” said CPW Director Dan Prenzlow. “This will ensure those who encountered errors within our system through no fault of their own can still apply to hunt in Colorado this year.” Approximately 20% of the almost 700,000 big game primary draw applications were submitted in the last 24 hours of the application period, which opens March 1 annually. The volume-related issues encountered by the system occurred as thousands of people were submitting applications as the deadline approached. Applicants are reminded that applying early allows for ample time to receive confirmation of their application and, in the case that they do experience any issues, for them to be resolved prior to the deadline. CPW advises hunters not to wait until the last minute to apply during this one-time extension to avoid any additional issues.  Hunters are encouraged to review the 2021 Colorado Big Game brochure for all updated regulations related to this year’s hunting seasons.   ### Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/7/2021 2:00 PM

Go fish! Colorado launches resident digital fishing license on myColorado™ app
4/7/2021 11:04:42 AM
Body: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Travis Duncan Statewide Public Information Officer 720-595-8294 / travis.duncan @state.co.us Go fish! Colorado launches resident digital fishing license on myColorado™ app Colorado residents can now display their fishing license on their smartphone through the myColorado™ app.  DENVER – Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s resident fishing licenses are now accessible through myColorado™, the State of Colorado’s official mobile app™. Resident anglers will purchase their fishing licenses the same way they always have and receive a printed physical license, but now they will also have the option to display it within the myColorado app.    The myColorado app gives Colorado residents the ability to create an electronic version of their Colorado driver’s license or state identification (ID) card on their smartphone as proof of identity within the state. Now, resident anglers can use it to show they have a valid fishing license as well. The myColorado app can be downloaded from the Apple App Store or Google Play . Visit myColorado.gov to learn more.    “We are excited to make it as easy as possible for Coloradans to show they’ve purchased their fishing licenses, allowing them to continue enjoying our state’s great outdoors,” said Governor Jared Polis. “Since my children are under 16, they can fish for free, but when I got my license a couple years ago I was surprised that there wasn’t an option to display my license on my phone. While a paper license still works for many people, it can be easy to forget at home, but many parents like me always have their phone on them. This new option meets Coloradans where they’re at, providing 21st century service.”  “Resident fishing license products are a great way for CPW to enter the digital arena with our licenses,” said CPW Director Dan Prenzlow. “We’ll continue to explore options for making proof of holding a valid license or pass easier for our customers.” Check out the myColorado FAQ document for more information about how to access your resident fishing license within the app Wallet. The specific fishing products anglers will see will include: Resident annual Resident youth annual Resident senior annual Resident 1-day Resident additional-day Resident senior low-income lifetime Resident disability lifetime Resident VA lifetime Resident first responder lifetime Extra rod stamp Moving forward, CPW will explore adding new products to the myColorado mobile app, such as individual park passes, dog-off leash passes and some annual hunting licenses. It’s time to go fish! CPW reminds anglers that it's time to get ready for another season of fishing. Coloradans and non-resident visitors alike can purchase a 2021 annual fishing license online , at your local CPW office or at any of our hundreds of authorized sales agents statewide .   An annual 2021 license is valid from March 1, 2021 through March 31, 2022. CPW provides a range of options for anglers including both the annual fishing license and one-day fishing licenses as well as educational opportunities for those new to angling.   One excellent resource is the CPW Fishing Report which is published bi-weekly. The CPW Fishing Report is available online , through the CPW Fishing app , and by subscribing to an email newsletter . The report provides the latest  fishing news and events in Colorado, describes current fishing conditions across the state and issues a stocking report .   CPW stocks 90 million fish annually into Colorado’s waters to ensure quality angling opportunities. CPW does not receive general tax dollars and fishing license fees support all statewide hatchery and fish-stocking operations.   Up-to-date regulations and pricing for annual, daily and multi-day licenses can be found in the 2021 Colorado Fishing Brochure ( Spanish version ). For individuals ages 18 through 64, a $10.40 Habitat Stamp is required with the first license purchase for the year. Youth under age 16 can fish for free and CPW provides opportunities throughout the season to learn how to fish.   Check out the myColorado digital fishing license media toolkit  for answers to frequently asked questions, social media messages, and stock images and screenshots for this exciting new feature. To learn more about fishing in Colorado, including 37 angling locations within Colorado state parks, visit our website at cpw.state.co.us .   ### Share Tweet Share Forward CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.       Copyright © 2021 Colorado Parks and Wildlife, All rights reserved. ReleaseDate: 4/7/2021 9:00 AM

 Google News about Wildlife

The following news articles are provided by the Google News service and do not reflect the views or imply an endorsement by the Colorado Land Conservation Assistance Network and its affiliates. We cannot guarantee the relevance of the content of this page or any links that may be followed from the articles herein.

Sage Grouse Habitat Management News Items
The Colorado valley at stake in Trump's oil boom - High Country News
7/19/2018 3:00:00 AM
The Colorado valley at stake in Trump's oil boom    High Country News

Wildlife Conservation Strategy News Items
Colorado Springs Police Department Recognized For Prestigious Interactive Media Award - Patch.com
4/9/2021 7:25:44 AM
Colorado Springs Police Department Recognized For Prestigious Interactive Media Award    Patch.com

Joe Biden's plan would spend $16B to clean up old mines and oil wells and support jobs to do it - The Colorado Sun
4/1/2021 3:00:00 AM
Joe Biden's plan would spend $16B to clean up old mines and oil wells and support jobs to do it    The Colorado Sun

As Colorado starts planning to bring back wolves, Rio Blanco County’s leaders say they won’t allow it - Lamar Ledger
3/21/2021 10:37:07 AM
As Colorado starts planning to bring back wolves, Rio Blanco County’s leaders say they won’t allow it    Lamar Ledger

Western states chart diverging paths as water shortages in Colorado River loom - The Durango Herald
3/19/2021 3:00:00 AM
Western states chart diverging paths as water shortages in Colorado River loom    The Durango Herald

PHOTOS: Sandhill Crane migration through Colorado’s San Luis Valley - The Denver Post
3/14/2021 4:00:00 AM
PHOTOS: Sandhill Crane migration through Colorado’s San Luis Valley    The Denver Post

Western states chart diverging paths as Colorado River water shortages loom - The Colorado Sun
3/11/2021 3:00:00 AM
Western states chart diverging paths as Colorado River water shortages loom    The Colorado Sun

As Colorado moves to reintroduce wolves, some states look to step up wolf kills - The Denver Post
3/7/2021 3:00:00 AM
As Colorado moves to reintroduce wolves, some states look to step up wolf kills    The Denver Post

Colorado to the public: wolf reintroduction will be slow - goHUNT.com
3/1/2021 3:00:00 AM
Colorado to the public: wolf reintroduction will be slow    goHUNT.com

Colorado Governor, Wildlife Officials Urged to Adopt Clearer, Quicker Wolf Restoration Plan - Center for Biological Diversity
2/17/2021 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Governor, Wildlife Officials Urged to Adopt Clearer, Quicker Wolf Restoration Plan    Center for Biological Diversity

Colorado and Nevada among the most environmentally worried states, new poll says - coloradopolitics.com
2/17/2021 3:00:00 AM
Colorado and Nevada among the most environmentally worried states, new poll says    coloradopolitics.com

Poll: Bipartisan Support for Conservation, Concern for Environment - Colorado College News
2/5/2021 3:00:00 AM
Poll: Bipartisan Support for Conservation, Concern for Environment    Colorado College News

A Look at Colorado's Preliminary Plan to Reintroduce Gray Wolves - 5280 | The Denver Magazine
2/1/2021 3:00:00 AM
A Look at Colorado's Preliminary Plan to Reintroduce Gray Wolves    5280 | The Denver Magazine

Joe Biden to pause oil and gas sales on public lands, call for conservation plan championed by Michael Bennet - The Colorado Sun
1/27/2021 3:00:00 AM
Joe Biden to pause oil and gas sales on public lands, call for conservation plan championed by Michael Bennet    The Colorado Sun

Colorado waters test free of invasive mussels - Journal Advocate
1/26/2021 3:00:00 AM
Colorado waters test free of invasive mussels    Journal Advocate

Joe Biden's pause on oil and gas development on public lands splits conservationists, industry - The Colorado Sun
1/25/2021 3:00:00 AM
Joe Biden's pause on oil and gas development on public lands splits conservationists, industry    The Colorado Sun

Colorado begins planning to reintroduce gray wolves - Summit Daily News
1/24/2021 3:00:00 AM
Colorado begins planning to reintroduce gray wolves    Summit Daily News

Colorado moves forward with wolf reintroduction - goHUNT.com
1/18/2021 3:00:00 AM
Colorado moves forward with wolf reintroduction    goHUNT.com

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission approves motion to create adaptive management plan to reintroduce wolves at virtual meeting - Craig Daily Press
1/15/2021 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission approves motion to create adaptive management plan to reintroduce wolves at virtual meeting    Craig Daily Press

[WATCH] Biologists spot massive herd of elk while conducting airborne survey - OutThere Colorado
12/30/2020 3:00:00 AM
[WATCH] Biologists spot massive herd of elk while conducting airborne survey    OutThere Colorado

At risk of extinction, black-footed ferrets in Colorado get experimental COVID vaccine - The Colorado Sun
12/23/2020 3:00:00 AM
At risk of extinction, black-footed ferrets in Colorado get experimental COVID vaccine    The Colorado Sun

Colorado wildlife experts take to the air - goHUNT.com
12/10/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado wildlife experts take to the air    goHUNT.com

In a Historic Vote, Colorado Has Officially Decided to Reintroduce Wolves to the State – Mother Jones - Mother Jones
12/8/2020 3:00:00 AM
In a Historic Vote, Colorado Has Officially Decided to Reintroduce Wolves to the State – Mother Jones    Mother Jones

Congressman Joe Neguse Calls For A National Biodiversity Strategy, Rejoining Paris Climate Agreement - Colorado Public Radio
12/2/2020 3:00:00 AM
Congressman Joe Neguse Calls For A National Biodiversity Strategy, Rejoining Paris Climate Agreement    Colorado Public Radio

Gray Wolf Reintroduction in Colorado Encounters Federal Kerfuffle - The Scientist
11/18/2020 3:00:00 AM
Gray Wolf Reintroduction in Colorado Encounters Federal Kerfuffle    The Scientist

US Forest Service approves protection of Colorado's Sweetwater Lake, but big questions remain - The Colorado Sun
11/16/2020 3:00:00 AM
US Forest Service approves protection of Colorado's Sweetwater Lake, but big questions remain    The Colorado Sun

Colorado Parks & Wildlife To Plan Restoration Efforts For Gray Wolves - Estes Park news
11/14/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Parks & Wildlife To Plan Restoration Efforts For Gray Wolves    Estes Park news

Will Colorado's vote to bring back wolves be a model for conservationists? - Successful Farming
11/13/2020 3:00:00 AM
Will Colorado's vote to bring back wolves be a model for conservationists?    Successful Farming

Colorado Parks and Wildlife to plan restoration efforts for gray wolves in Colorado - Journal Advocate
11/9/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Parks and Wildlife to plan restoration efforts for gray wolves in Colorado    Journal Advocate

The Colorado Climate Voter's Guide To The 2020 Election Results - Colorado Public Radio
11/8/2020 3:00:00 AM
The Colorado Climate Voter's Guide To The 2020 Election Results    Colorado Public Radio

Colorado Passes Proposition 114 to Reintroduce Gray Wolves - 5280 | The Denver Magazine
11/5/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Passes Proposition 114 to Reintroduce Gray Wolves    5280 | The Denver Magazine

Lawsuit Challenges Pendley Over 1.7 Million-Acre Fossil Fuel Plan in Colorado - Center for Biological Diversity
10/27/2020 3:00:00 AM
Lawsuit Challenges Pendley Over 1.7 Million-Acre Fossil Fuel Plan in Colorado    Center for Biological Diversity

A bold plan to protect 30% of Colorado lands and waters by 2030 - The Colorado Sun
10/15/2020 3:00:00 AM
A bold plan to protect 30% of Colorado lands and waters by 2030    The Colorado Sun

Governor Proclaims October 'Colorado Lottery Conservation Month' | YourHub - The Know
10/8/2020 3:00:00 AM
Governor Proclaims October 'Colorado Lottery Conservation Month' | YourHub    The Know

Proposition 114 explained: What's at stake with the effort to reintroduce gray wolves in Colorado - The Colorado Sun
9/24/2020 3:00:00 AM
Proposition 114 explained: What's at stake with the effort to reintroduce gray wolves in Colorado    The Colorado Sun

Kill fish to save fish: Behind Colorado's effort to revive the Rio Grande cutthroat trout - The Colorado Sun
9/24/2020 3:00:00 AM
Kill fish to save fish: Behind Colorado's effort to revive the Rio Grande cutthroat trout    The Colorado Sun

Audubon “Wingspan” Weighs in on Colorado River Lake Powell Pipeline | Audubon - National Audubon Society
9/9/2020 3:00:00 AM
Audubon “Wingspan” Weighs in on Colorado River Lake Powell Pipeline | Audubon    National Audubon Society

The Fight to Bring the Gray Wolf Back to Colorado | Westword - Westword
9/8/2020 3:00:00 AM
The Fight to Bring the Gray Wolf Back to Colorado | Westword    Westword

Colorado Parks and Wildlife offering refunds for some permits affected by wildfires - goHUNT.com
8/21/2020 3:00:00 AM
Colorado Parks and Wildlife offering refunds for some permits affected by wildfires    goHUNT.com

Lawsuit Targets Trump Administration Fossil Fuel Plan in Colorado 'Climate Hot Spot' - Center for Biological Diversity
8/19/2020 3:00:00 AM
Lawsuit Targets Trump Administration Fossil Fuel Plan in Colorado 'Climate Hot Spot'    Center for Biological Diversity

RMEF helps raise over $2.57 million for Colorado elk and other wildlife - goHUNT.com
8/18/2020 3:00:00 AM
RMEF helps raise over $2.57 million for Colorado elk and other wildlife    goHUNT.com

Alternative plan to Wild and Scenic River designation for upper Colorado River OK'd - Aspen Times
7/11/2020 3:00:00 AM
Alternative plan to Wild and Scenic River designation for upper Colorado River OK'd    Aspen Times

GOCO's transition to new grant distribution strategy creates avenue for Colorado coronavirus relief - The Colorado Sun
6/5/2020 3:00:00 AM
GOCO's transition to new grant distribution strategy creates avenue for Colorado coronavirus relief    The Colorado Sun

Federal Plan Endangers Recovery for Dwindling Gunnison Sage Grouse in Colorado, Utah - Center for Biological Diversity
10/31/2019 3:00:00 AM
Federal Plan Endangers Recovery for Dwindling Gunnison Sage Grouse in Colorado, Utah    Center for Biological Diversity